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  #11  
Old 09-10-2022, 01:57 PM
Aldous Aldous is offline
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TB Incidence in the United States, 1953-2020
https://www.cdc.gov/tb/statistics/tbcases.htm

Explanations for 20th Century Tuberculosis Decline: How the Public Gets It Wrong
https://www.scirp.org/journal/paperi...?paperid=70106
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  #12  
Old 05-11-2022, 02:24 PM
Aldous Aldous is offline
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What Tuberculosis did for Modernism: The Influence of a Curative Environment on Modernist Design and Architecture
MARGARET CAMPBELL, MPhil*
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1251640/

How Tuberculosis Shaped Victorian Fashion
The deadly disease—and later efforts to control it—influenced trends for decades
Emily Mullin
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...ion-180959029/

https://lawrencebroxmeyermd.wordpress.com/
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  #13  
Old 27-11-2022, 04:16 PM
Aldous Aldous is offline
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This is strange. TB is often associated with the vampire superstition.

Simon Whipple Aldrich
Birth 1814
Death 6 May 1841 (aged 26–27)

Inscription
Though Consumption's vampire grasp had seized thy mortal frame, Thy ardent and inspiring mind, untouched, remained the same.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=49630850


The Great New England Vampire Panic
Smithonian Magazine October 2012
http://sciliterature.50webs.com/VampirePanic.htm

https://sciliterature.50webs.com/TB.htm
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  #14  
Old 27-11-2022, 11:51 PM
Traveler Traveler is offline
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A couple of years ago we had a really bad time with fleas and before I was able to get the fleas out of the house, my cat Leo got sick with a Mycoplasma haemofelis bacteria that infects the hemoglobin. He started losing weight and lost his appetite. I took him in for bloodwork and it showed he was anemic as well. And this was like 2 or 3 months of being flea free that his symptoms appeared. Fortunately it was treatable but there are only certain antibiotics that are effective against this mycoplasma and the bloodwork didn't really confirm but only indicated that a mycoplasma infection might be possible given the anemia. I got him on the antibiotics and started giving him an iron supplement and within a couple of weeks Sir Fluffernutter was feeling frisky enough to have WWE worthy throw down wrestling matches with his sister, lol. Now everytime I see one of the beasts scratching, I panic and I pull out the flea drops.

I remember reading several years back that scientists are now suspecting a bacteria as a cause for Crohn's after trial runs of doxycycline (If I remember correctly) caused improvement in the disease. I'm guessing it's both a bacterial infection as well as dysbiosis of the gut flora.
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  #15  
Old 24-12-2022, 05:14 PM
Aldous Aldous is offline
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Quote:
So people who were first infected as children back in the 1940s and 50s — and who have shown no sign of TB for over 50 years — are succumbing to the disease as their immune systems weaken.

https://www.nature.com/articles/502S14a

1 out of 3 Koreans diagnosed with latent tuberculosis
https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nat...19_264265.html
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  #16  
Old 24-12-2022, 11:01 PM
Aldous Aldous is offline
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I found this article years ago and was looking for it and couldn't find it online recently. I found a print out I printed out years ago and found the link and used archive dot org to find the article.

https://web.archive.org/web/20131227...ealth-disease/

It discusses research on autism, Asperger’s syndrome, Down's syndrome, schizophrenia and epilepsy being caused by TB, apparently cell-wall-deficient (CWD) forms of tuberculosis that can cross the placenta and infect the fetus.
Quote:
It is not generally appreciated that the development of small rounded nodules caused by tuberculosis, sometimes cheesy or “caseous” in the brain is a relatively common occurrence in children and childhood tuberculosis. It is usually symptomless. Such small nodules often then become arrested and encapsulated by the body’s immune system. They are, to this day, called “Rich’s Foci”. Many of us unknowingly have them.
Quote:
It wasn’t only Welch that Rich put himself at odds with. German investigator Baumgarten who saw infection of the fetus by the spores of TB coming from the maternal placenta as a common occurrence.[2] In fact, to Baumgarten , all tuberculosis, including neurotuberculosis, was most commonly acquired in the womb, in utero, in most cases, though there remained a lesser possibility, that it could occur through infected sperm.Ophuls mentioned that it was a well established fact that the semen of tuberculous individuals contains tubercle bacilli, even in the absence of genital TB.

Quote:
Psychiatric Asylums on the European and American continent, late Nineteenth Century
When Johns Hopkins pathologist William Henry Welch studied under psychiatrist Maynert, it was in the late nineteenth century, a time during which there was fear that tuberculosis would destroy the entire civilization of Europe. It was also the time that the first massive increase in psychiatric illness and confinement to mental asylums occurred.[1]
There's something related here about Much's granules on page 18 about TB that has lost its acid fast characteristics.
https://archive.org/details/pulmonar...p?view=theater

Last edited by Aldous : 25-12-2022 at 12:03 AM.
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  #17  
Old 25-12-2022, 10:40 PM
Traveler Traveler is offline
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I was listening to the radio a few nights ago and the commentator was mentioning that the people who survived the plague identified the gene that gave them that ability and today people with that gene are more likely to have autoimmune diseases.

Quote:
Summary: People with selected variants of the ERAP2 and TICAM2 genes were 40% more likely to survive the Black Death, researchers discovered. However, in modern humans, those with the ERAP2 gene are more likely to suffer autoimmune disorders such as Crohn's disease.

https://neurosciencenews.com/genetic-plague-autoimmune-22039/#:~:text=Summary%3A%20People%20with%20selected%20v ariants,disorders%20such%20as%20Crohn's%20disease.
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  #18  
Old 21-01-2023, 10:40 PM
Aldous Aldous is offline
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Mycobacterium vaccae is a nonpathogenic[1] species of the Mycobacteriaceae family of bacteria that lives naturally in soil.
Research areas being pursued with regard to killed Mycobacterium vaccae vaccine include immunotherapy for allergic asthma, cancer, depression,[4][5] leprosy,[6] psoriasis, dermatitis, eczema and tuberculosis.[6]

A research group at Henry Wellcome Laboratories for Integrative Neuroscience and Endocrinology, University of Bristol, Bristol, England, UK has shown that Mycobacterium vaccae stimulated a newly discovered group of neurons, increased levels of serotonin and decreased levels of anxiety in mice.[1] Other researchers fed live Mycobacterium vaccae to mice, then measured their ability to navigate a maze compared to control mice not fed the bacteria. "Mice that were fed live M. vaccae navigated the maze twice as fast and with less demonstrated anxiety behaviors as control mice", according to Dorothy Matthews, who conducted the research with Susan Jenks at the Sage Colleges, Troy, New York, USA.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycobacterium_vaccae
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  #19  
Old 24-01-2023, 02:33 AM
Aldous Aldous is offline
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I remember seeing this in the news a couple years ago. Journalists are usually very alarmist when it comes to TB. Maybe the sensationalism helps sell their news.

https://www.cnn.com/videos/health/20...oll-nr-vpx.cnn

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ins/762534002/

--------------------------------------------
With all the panic and alarmism seen with TB, I thought it was strange to see pictures like this from a Sanatarium in the 1960s. Note the patients smiling and the nurses aren't wearing masks.
http://www.feltondesignanddata.com/c...red/id273.html
They were using streptomycin back then, so most survived.
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