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Pewdiepie 16-03-2019 08:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yamah
What is Ego? Ego is the Self. To be lost in ego thus means to be lost in one's self; building up the self's esteem, the self's worth, the self's righteousness, etc. While on a lone path it is very easy to fall into Ego because you have only your self for company. If you do not connect to anything outside of yourself then you are only exploring your own mind. This is why connecting to a group, tradition, teacher, spirit, God or whatever is so important - so that you aren't just lost in your own ego but instead are engaging something else... thus quieting the ego to an extent. If what you are engaging happens to be something true then it is that much more worth while.

Gnostics, Eclectics and other solitaries claim that they are not exploring their own egos but rather the depths of their spirits, their spirit guides, the spiritual world to which they are connected or other realms accessed through meditative or spiritual means. Some of these people may be right but in my experience the vast majority are lost in their own imaginations. Those that ARE accessing some kind of spiritual realm aren't experiencing it purely but are experiencing it through the cloudy lens of their own egos, confirming things that are imagined and intuiting the unconfirmable.

I personally used to be an eclectic until I realized how far into my own ego I had wandered. My desire to find truth, clarity and morality led me down the path I'm currently on. I've met many people, before and after my 'switch' from all kinds of paths. I still have plenty of ego left and I'm aware of it but at least now I know how to identify it.



Don't forget that Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, the supposed author of the Zohar, lived in solitude for 13 years with his son and had many spiritual revelations during that time.

According to the Babylonian Talmud, Rabbi Shimon bar Yohai criticized the Roman government and was forced to go into hiding with his son for thirteen years. They sheltered in a cave (which local tradition places in Peki'in). Next to the mouth of the cave a carob tree sprang up and a spring of fresh water gushed forth. Provided against hunger and thirst they cast off their clothing except during prayers and sabbath to keep them from wearing out, embedded themselves in the sand up to their necks, and studied the Torah all day long. He and his son left the cave when they received a bat qol (divine revelation) saying that the Roman emperor had died and consequently all his decrees were abolished...

Although his circumstances were extraordinary, it is still a good example of how solitude can grow spirituality without being clouded by the ego

dybmh 15-04-2019 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pewdiepie
Don't forget that Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, the supposed author of the Zohar, lived in solitude for 13 years with his son and had many spiritual revelations during that time.

According to the Babylonian Talmud, Rabbi Shimon bar Yohai criticized the Roman government and was forced to go into hiding with his son for thirteen years. They sheltered in a cave (which local tradition places in Peki'in). Next to the mouth of the cave a carob tree sprang up and a spring of fresh water gushed forth. Provided against hunger and thirst they cast off their clothing except during prayers and sabbath to keep them from wearing out, embedded themselves in the sand up to their necks, and studied the Torah all day long. He and his son left the cave when they received a bat qol (divine revelation) saying that the Roman emperor had died and consequently all his decrees were abolished...

Although his circumstances were extraordinary, it is still a good example of how solitude can grow spirituality without being clouded by the ego


Hello Everyone, just getting caught up on this thread. Also ( I'm a newbie :icon_eek: )

I want to comment on the most recent post and the word "solitude". I think the conventional understanding of the writing of the Zohar by Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai is that he had divine assistance while dwelling in the cave. In this way, he was not in solitude.

I think it's an important distinction because otherwise a person may believe that the Zohar is a creation of Rabbi Shimon.

Scholarly Tarot 18-01-2021 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dybmh
Hello Everyone, just getting caught up on this thread. Also ( I'm a newbie :icon_eek: )

I want to comment on the most recent post and the word "solitude". I think the conventional understanding of the writing of the Zohar by Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai is that he had divine assistance while dwelling in the cave. In this way, he was not in solitude.

I think it's an important distinction because otherwise a person may believe that the Zohar is a creation of Rabbi Shimon.


Shalom!
Just as a heads up, Gershom Scholem, one of the very finest Kabbalistic scholars to ever publish, has noted and demonstrated with actually really good evidence and analysis, that it was Moses de Leon who authored the Zohar. He was also possibly helped by his very good friend and outstanding Kabbalist in medieval Castile Joseph Gikatila. Leon was living in Guadalajara in the heart of Castile at the time in 1280 and there abouts. He writes extensively about this in his book "Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism," and talks about it more in his book "Kabbalah."

GlitterRose 20-01-2021 12:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scholarly Tarot
Shalom!
Just as a heads up, Gershom Scholem, one of the very finest Kabbalistic scholars to ever publish, has noted and demonstrated with actually really good evidence and analysis, that it was Moses de Leon who authored the Zohar. He was also possibly helped by his very good friend and outstanding Kabbalist in medieval Castile Joseph Gikatila. Leon was living in Guadalajara in the heart of Castile at the time in 1280 and there abouts. He writes extensively about this in his book "Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism," and talks about it more in his book "Kabbalah."


Gershom Scholem is very knowledgeable. I came across him while watching some lectures on Kabbalah.

Scholarly Tarot 21-01-2021 12:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GlitterRose
Gershom Scholem is very knowledgeable. I came across him while watching some lectures on Kabbalah.


He was. One of the best in his day. Now then, that doesn't mean he was always right either, lol....
I know the medieval scholar Norman F. Cantor had quite a few disagreements with him, as did others I am sure. Hey we gotta read all sides thought eh? That's the best way I think, so long as we don't take any of them as the final say so. Easier said than done...

GlitterRose 05-02-2021 01:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scholarly Tarot
He was. One of the best in his day. Now then, that doesn't mean he was always right either, lol....
I know the medieval scholar Norman F. Cantor had quite a few disagreements with him, as did others I am sure. Hey we gotta read all sides thought eh? That's the best way I think, so long as we don't take any of them as the final say so. Easier said than done...


Good point. It is important not to put anyone on a pedestal as infallible. Sometimes great insight comes from unlikely sources.

ketzer 05-02-2021 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Adept
Has anyone else noticed that Judaism seems to have some correlation to modern occultism..... Any thoughts?


No, but probably only because I have not looked that closely. It seems to me that because of the nature of what religion seeks to understand and explain, namely the unknowable, that occultism is inevitable to pop up in the distribution of beliefs that make it up. Jewish cults, Muslim Cults, Christian Cults, for that matter Political and Personality Cults, ...seems to be a human tendency regarding all ideologies for cults to form within them. It also seems to me that the more into the weeds of ones religion one gets, the more one sees these pockets of different interpretations, sometimes rather bazar, forming. When they get really strange we start saying cultish or occult.

Do you think that Judaism is somehow more prone to it then the others?
If so, why?

RabbiO 05-02-2021 09:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ketzer

Do you think that Judaism is somehow more prone to it then the others?
If so, why?

Given that the OP is apparently no longer a member of the forum, and given that the OP's last post on this thread was about 6 1/2 years ago, you probably shouldn't hold your breath awaiting a response.

ketzer 05-02-2021 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RabbiO
Given that the OP is apparently no longer a member of the forum, and given that the OP's last post on this thread was about 6 1/2 years ago, you probably shouldn't hold your breath awaiting a response.


I really should learn to check those dates when I come across these threads. I am going to blame it all on GlitterRose since that is how I stumbled across this thread. Anyway, it is an interesting question. I have never thought of Judaism as being particularly occult. Just my impression, but it seems even less so then Christianity, but then there are a lot more of the latter so.

Scholarly Tarot 20-02-2021 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ketzer
I really should learn to check those dates when I come across these threads. I am going to blame it all on GlitterRose since that is how I stumbled across this thread. Anyway, it is an interesting question. I have never thought of Judaism as being particularly occult. Just my impression, but it seems even less so then Christianity, but then there are a lot more of the latter so.


I agree the question is a great one. However, if I may slightly differ with you on emphasis, since, I am at least understanding occult to be what is hidden, not necessarily evil magic (I was taught that is what it was and stupidly went with that for far too long until I studied it out for myself, ayiyi). I actually do think Judaism is an occult religion in some respects, I have in mind the medieval materials of the Sefer Yetzirah, Bahir, and Zohar, not to mention the Kabbalah. Now, I hasten to add, true enough, today those are all being thrown out to the public. I hope it's not a sign of how badly we need them in order to make it as a society. We are in pretty doggone haggard times, to be sure. But the amazing amounts of light and knowledge with all the Judaistic publishing of the hidden literatures in the last 20 years is just breath taking.

I suspect all religions have an occult side, it would be surprising if they didn't. Yet we are at the dawning of the Age of Aquarius, and perhaps all that which is hidden is finally going to come out. I hope for our enlightenment, not due to our being off so bad we NEED it.


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