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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Lifestyle > Vegetarian & Vegan

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  #11  
Old 10-03-2016, 01:42 PM
Nameless Nameless is offline
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Quick Vegan Pizzas

I bought (2) Xpress Redi Set go's a long time ago, and pretty much only cook pizzas in them - they don't sell them anymore. But you can also cook them in the oven @ 450 degrees farenheight for between 5 - 10 minutes on a thin baking sheet or pizza pan.

Instead of making the dough, I cheat now and use small flour tortillas - quick and easy.

For the pizza sauce, you can use jarred sauce (after reading the label). Bascially they are all tomatoes with spices. Alternatively, you can make your own. I take a small (5 - 6 oz) can of tomato paste and add some water - not a lot, just enough to thin, and add spices like basil and oregano and a pinch of sugar.

Use any toppings you like - my son likes sliced artichoke hearts & black olives. Or sliced bell peppers and onions. Use could cook up some Gimme Lean as well and use as the base with vegges.

You don't actually have to add cheese to a pizza. Although sometimes he will add some Daiya grated cheese because it melts.

They turn out nice - like a thin crust crunchy pizza
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  #12  
Old 10-03-2016, 02:29 PM
mogenblue mogenblue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nameless
Mogenblue - sounds yummy! My son does not use soy, so he makes his hummus with chickpeas (garbanzo beans). As a vegan, it does limit his choices a lot though.

You could do it with white beans too if you like.

The hummus is a variation on almond roll (I don't know the exact translation to english). It is half almonds, half sugar and a tip of citrus shell and it's left in the fridge for at least a week to develop more taste.
The hummus way is more nutritious because of the beans. And this is easy to spread on bread. I like it a little better with hazelnuts. They have a more pronounced taste then almonds. Either way it's delicious. You can also freeze it in small portions for later use.

---

Home made pizza's are great. You can stack them up as high as you like. Nothing compares to that. I make my own dough at home. I have a great kneading machine for that.
Usually I eat them in summer time.
This year I might try using chopped seitan for toppings too. And nutritional yeast for a cheesy touch.
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  #13  
Old 11-03-2016, 01:33 AM
Tobi Tobi is offline
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Nameless, I will definitely think of using flour tortillas as a pizza base, if I can find them here, as I like crunchy thin crust pizzas! I sometimes used to use pitta bread as a base for a home cooked pizza, which is quite good. Then tomato puree, with basil, peppers, mushrooms, onion rings, crushed garlic. That is not high-protein but is jolly nice!
I am still investigating vegan cheese options (available here in UK in the health food store) Some don't taste so good, and some may not have 'cookability'....but as they are all quite expensive, that can end up in an expensive mistake! I wish I could find that cheese you mentioned..."Daiya", here.
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  #14  
Old 11-03-2016, 03:31 AM
Nameless Nameless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tobi
Nameless, I will definitely think of using flour tortillas as a pizza base, if I can find them here, as I like crunchy thin crust pizzas! I sometimes used to use pitta bread as a base for a home cooked pizza, which is quite good. Then tomato puree, with basil, peppers, mushrooms, onion rings, crushed garlic. That is not high-protein but is jolly nice!
I am still investigating vegan cheese options (available here in UK in the health food store) Some don't taste so good, and some may not have 'cookability'....but as they are all quite expensive, that can end up in an expensive mistake! I wish I could find that cheese you mentioned..."Daiya", here.

I looked them up for you. Turns out, they are a Canadian company, but if you just put your zip code in the zip code finder, they will find you a store LOL

http://daiyafoods.com/find-us/where-to-buy/

It is pricey - about twice the amount you pay for cheese here. The other vegan cheeses are not so good, I take it.

We actually had pizza tonight (LOA in action!) it sounded so good this morning, and I ran out of tomato paste, so I used tomato sauce instead with dried oregano and basil and Italian Seasoning. It tasted better than the jarred stuff! So yeah!

I have heard of cashew cheese - I found vegan motzarella recipe for you

http://itdoesnttastelikechicken.com/...gan-mozarella/
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  #15  
Old 11-03-2016, 07:41 AM
mogenblue mogenblue is offline
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Choco paste / choco hummus

It's actually very easy to make your own choco paste. I find it taste more authentic then what you buy in the supermarket. Carob syrup complements the taste of cocoa powder. It gives a richer experience. If you don't have that you could use about 5 grams of cocoa powder extra.
You could add some hazelnuts to create your own nutella. If you grind them together with the beans you get a smooth mix. Adding them at the end gives a crunchy bite to your paste. The choco taste is rich enough for me.
You can divide the paste in smaller portions and save them in the freezer for later use.


100 grams dry soybeans or white beans / 225 grams cooked beans
4 tbs / 40 grams of olive oil or canola oil
75-100 grams tapwater
150 grams sugar
25 grams cocoa powder
15 grams carob syrup
4 ts vanilla essence
tip of salt

Soak the beans overnight, rinse under running water, cook them ready in about 40 minutes.
Put all the ingredients in the food processor and mix to a smooth paste.

If you want to spice it up you could add some cardemom and/or ginger powder to it.
Or use strawberry syrup instead of the sugar. Whatever...
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  #16  
Old 12-03-2016, 06:24 PM
mogenblue mogenblue is offline
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Indian omelet, pudla


I like this recipe a lot. I have done it three times now and I really enjoyed it. The flour makes it very light digestible and the recipe is very versatile. It's rich in protein. You can also use any left over veggies from yesterday.
I got this from a dutch vegan recipe site. The comments below said that some people find it too wet and they would use less water next time. I really don't mind it being so wet. If it's not well done on the inside it feels more like pudding. I like that too. When I baked eggs in the past I used to like it if the yolk would not have solidified completely. I liked them best when the yolk would still be liquid. So how well done you want it is a matter of taste.


65 grams chickpea flour aka gram flour
1/4 tsp backing soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 tbs spices (indian curry, mexican, thai, wasabi, french, italian, etc.)
180 gram water (100 gram minimum)
1 tbs lemon juice
1 + 1/2 cup fine cut veggies


Mix the flour, soda, salt and spices in a bowl. Add gradually water and lemon juice and mix to a thick pastry. Mix the fine cut veggies thoroughly through. Let it rise for a little while.
Warm a frying pan with oil on low fire. Pour the pastry in the middle and spread it out to a thick cake. Use a spatula to get the last drops from the bowl. You paid for it...
Cover it and let it bake softly until the bottom is nicely brown and the top starts to curdle. Flip it around with a plate and let the top curdle well too. Take your time so the inside is nicely done and the omelet doesn't burn. I use the timer for 7 + 7 minutes to give it all it needs, it's worth it. Twice 5 minutes would be minimum.
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  #17  
Old 12-03-2016, 06:39 PM
Nameless Nameless is offline
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The Indian Omelet sounds good - I will have to give that a try - not that the other receipts don't, but they look a bit beyond my capabilities LOL - I am a very simple basic cook, even after all these years of cooking...
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  #18  
Old 12-03-2016, 06:56 PM
Nameless Nameless is offline
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Hash Browns

I know there is little to no nutritional value in these, but they are so good, we have them about twice a year.

Helps if you have strong arms or a food processor.

Peel 4 -6 large potatoes (4 usually serves 4 people but you may want extras it is so yummy)

Grate them with the food processor.

Add garlic powder (I don't measure this, but I think its about 2 tablespoons, maybe more - we like garlic) vegan worchestershire sauce (shoot, I never measure this either - about 4 - 6 squirts from the bottle)

Put in a bowl and cover the bowl with plastic wrap - for those that don't use plastic wrap, use a bowl that has a glass cover. You want them basically to steam.

I usually microwave them for about six to eight minutes, the same amount you would cook a baked potato at. They come out of the microwave very steamy and sticky - like glue.

Heat a frying pan at medium heat and heat about 2 tablespoons of Earth Balance Butter in the pan, then plop the potatoes in the pan and smooth them out to the edges with a spoon. Add some small butter dollops to the top and cover them and cook for about 5 minutes or more, until a crunchy crust forms. Flip this potatoey goodness using a plate, and add some of the butter underneath - don't put any on the top this time, and cover and cook for another 5 minutes or so,until a crunchy crust forms, or until you can't take it anymore and decide its done because you can't wait.

They are crunchy on the outside and gooey goodness on the inside, nothing like what you would get at a restaurant.

They are not very figure friendly, but for a twice yearly treat, they are scrumptious!
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  #19  
Old 12-03-2016, 07:21 PM
Nameless Nameless is offline
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Open Faced Tacos

As you can probably tell, my son has adapted some of my recipes as vegan. This is the Original Recipe (the vegan alternative is in asterisks)

4 servings

1 Large Can of Chili Beans (heat in the sauce it comes in)
1 8 oz can of tomato sauce
10 - 12 squirts of Worchestershire Sauce (vegan brand)
1 pound hamburger, cooked and drained (gimme lean crumbles cooked)
1/2 - 1 Head of Iceburg Lettuce - (wash, let drain, and put back in the frig and when you need to use it, it will be crispy and crunchy) - bite size pieces
2 - 4 tomatoes (depends on if you all like a lot of tomatoes) - diced
1 small to medium onion - diced
1 small bag of Mission Tortilla Chips (the Round kind)
Grated Cheddar Cheese (Daiya Cheddar - grated)

So, start cooking the hamburger in a frying pan, heating the chili beans in a sauce pot and for the sauce, heat the tomato sauce, adding the worchestershire sauce to it, in another sauce pot. While this is all heating up, chop up the rest of the ingredients as noted above.

How to build an Individual Open Face Taco: (the original way)

On a stoneware plate place a layer of chips on the bottom of the plate, making sure none of the chips are facing down
Sprinkle some of the hamburger on the chips
Sprinkle some of the cheese on the hamburger
Put a layer of the chili beans on top of the cheese - this melts the cheese-yum
Put a layer of lettuce on top of the chili beans
Put some tomatoes and onion on top of the lettuce (to taste)
Spoon some of the tomato/worchestershire sauce* on the top. (We call this kidsauce, because it is not in the least spicy, so the kids would eat it

This all turns into a goey melty thing. You can eat it with a fork for awhile, and then eat it with your fingers when you get down to the chips part.

Then you can change it up however you like. If you don't eat cheese, don'd add cheese. If you like sour cream, try a small bite with some veganaise. You could add avocado slices as well.

This is a quick and easy way to make tacos without having to fry any tortillas. You can make it diet friendly by not adding the cheese and watch the portion size. These expand as you build them, so just know that. I like a lot of lettuce and sauce on mine. People then can make it however they like to eat it, let them build their own....
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  #20  
Old 30-03-2016, 04:40 AM
mogenblue mogenblue is offline
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Peanut hummus

Peanut butter is very popular on bread. It's sweet, creamy and savory and very nutritious. Most peanut butters have transfats which are not so good for your health. They are used to keep the butter creamy and in shape. To avoid that you can use organic peanut butter. You will see the oil come floating on top of that because the transfats are not there to keep the butter in shape. So that is your proof of real good peanut butter.

As an alternative you can also make your own peanut butter. If you want to make it with only peanuts you need a very powerful food processor like a Vitamix or you have to let your regular foodprocessor run for about 15 minutes or so to get the same result. I am not so patient and I don't like to keep my machines running for so long. I suppose my tools won't live that long if I do that too often.
As a compromise I decided to add more ingredients to ease the process of grinding and mixing.

The fine thing about making your own peanut spread or hummus, whatever you want to call it, is that you can add your own flavors. When using beans you can use different kinds of beans. It's good for your general health to have variation of the ingredients.

I usually use Indian curry spices for extra flavor. There is a whole range of them: tandoori, vindaloo, curry madras and the list goes on. But you can also use other mixes like mexican, wasabi, chili, indonesian. Basically everything you can get your hands on and that looks good enough to end up in your peanut hummus. You will have to experiment how much you need to get the right taste. Well, worse things could happen to you...


Ingredients:
125 g dry beans or 280 grams cooked beans
250 g peanuts
6 tbs / 60 g arachid or olive oil
350-400 grams water
30 g spice mix
3 tbs / 30 soy sauce


How to:
Soak the dry beans overnight in the fridge, rinse them under running water and cook them for about 40 minutes. Kidney beans need about 60 minutes. Most other beans can do with 40 minutes.
You can use the water you used for cooking the beans in the hummus. It will give more flavor.
Put all the ingredients in a food processor and mix to a smooth paste.
You can divide the hummus in smaller portions and save them in the freezer for later use.
The hummus will stay good for about 3-4 days in the fridge.
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