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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Spirituality & Beliefs > General Beliefs

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  #11  
Old 21-09-2017, 10:52 PM
shivatar shivatar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kioma
For a 'spiritual' forum I've seen a LOT of disparagement of the 'New Age'. Why is that? What do you think New Age is?


In every age of great activity in human history there has been a "new group" and an "old group".

The tendency of the old group is to say "the new one is too young to know what they are talking about, we have stood the test of time, we know what we are talking about".

And the tendency of the new group is the attitude of the rebel, it often suggests we challenge what we have come to accept as true. it challenges dogmas.



From what I've heard about new age beliefs is they are a conglomeration of beliefs and ideas that began in the early 20th century and came from a few influential thinkers at that time. One of the big ones I hear is carlos castenada. I guess a lot of new age beliefs are derived from his writings.

One big complaint I hear is that the new age beliefs are not structured. Religion is highly structured.

many people who turn to new age and enjoy it's lack of structure are people who have been wronged in some way by religion.
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  #12  
Old 21-09-2017, 11:01 PM
LibraIndigo LibraIndigo is offline
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I dunno. Some people say I am new age. I just study all religions and find where they intersect.

That could also be called baha'i though
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  #13  
Old 21-09-2017, 11:40 PM
Moonglow Moonglow is offline
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Hello,

From what I can gather from what I've come across over the years, some have been saying we have entered or entering a "new age". Opening up to being more compassionate and loving. Looking at the current ways in the world feel this can be debated. But, not meaning to debate.

"New Age" to me in some respects is a marketing term to attract those looking to expand one self development and spiritual growth. It does become a kind of mish-mash of eastern philosophies and practices and western thinking.

Yoganada brought the teachings of Yoga over to the US in '20s-'30s, I believe.
(Correct me if being inaccurate on dates). Which to me started opening the door to new ways (atleast in western culture) of exploring oneself.

Yoga practice been around for thousands of year, as well as Hinduism, Buhddism, and other practices of Native American Tribes and Pagen Religions.

In current decades ('60s, 70s,-to current), atleast in America and possibly other western nations these practices have spread and have been discovered by some. People have found a connection with them. Which has opened society more to accept some of the practices and made them less exclusive and more accessible. Which gave rise to the "new age" movement, as I understand it.

The downside may be that the true essence and purpose of the practices and rituals may get watered down. The " old ways" and teachings get muddled a bit and the general public may get a dummy down version of them. Not understanding the true discipline and dedication required to master such practices and disciplines.( atleast the public in general)

There is the upside as well and the more research is done showing the benefits of such practices as meditation and mindfulness.

Along with this, psychology gets thrown in the mix as well as nutritional health.
Not saying it is a bad thing necessarily, just can be confusing as to what one "should" be doing to obtain balance in ones life or spiritual connection.

Would say follow one heart and do the research. Find what works for you and not necessarily what is marketed out there as being the answer.

Mind you these are just my thoughts on this.
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  #14  
Old 22-09-2017, 12:31 AM
Kioma Kioma is offline
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Thanks to all the members who brought it.
As has been shown, the disparagement is out there. Actually, there is no shortage of opinions, for or against. For me personally, I'd like to say that while not every guy with an OBE, a book, and tents for 'retreats' in his back yard is a guru (my opinion), so every person with a few slick quips and a chip on his shoulder is likewise not necessarily a religious authority (again my opinion).

I agree, it is very much about What you want, and it should be. In my experience, however, spirit often sends what you need, ignoring what you want. Perhaps some bright person will figure out how to improve that at some point.

The debate goes on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by knightoflenity
...New age is the jeet kune do of religious practice...
Back to Wikipedia:

Jeet Kune Do (Chinese: 截拳道; Cantonese Yale: Jit6kyun4dou6; [tsìːt̚.kʰy̏ːn.tòu]), abbreviated JKD, is a hybrid philosophy of martial arts heavily influenced by the personal philosophy and experiences of martial artist Bruce Lee. Lee, who founded the system on July 9, 1969, referred to it as "non-classical", suggesting that JKD is a form of Chinese Kung Fu, yet without form.

But wait! There's more!

Bruce believed that kata forms and martial art tournament matches alike (like Karate) were simply "organised despair". He believed that in order to "fully express oneself, one must" "have no limitations" (kata and rigid and non-flowing movements being the limitation).

Are you suggesting that Bruce Lee's thinking and fighting were innately 'New Age'? If traditional Kung Fu's limitation was it's inherent structure, what might the effective counter-style be, hmmmm?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorelyen
Then please take a seat and I'll bring the champagne round once I've stopped playing the piano...

Pandas can play the piano?


Quote:
Originally Posted by shivatar
One big complaint I hear is that the new age beliefs are not structured. Religion is highly structured.
Now THAT'S a valid sounding criticism, to which I would say... Your mileage may vary.

I think it's all about individual preference. Traditional religion is still very popular, and gives all indication of not going away very soon if ever. There are those people who thrive on structure - but there are those others who choke on structure, and require something much more open (Bruce Lee?). It is those people who seem to be coming into their own in this 'age'.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LibraIndigo
That could also be called baha'i though

Baha'i? Once again I turn to Wikipedia:

Bahá'í teachings are in some ways similar to other monotheistic faiths: God is considered single and all-powerful. However, Bahá'u'lláh taught that religion is orderly and progressively revealed by one God through Manifestations of God who are the founders of major world religions throughout history; Buddha, Jesus, and Muhammad being the most recent in the period before the Báb and Bahá'u'lláh. As such, Bahá'ís regard the major religions as fundamentally unified in purpose, though varied in social practices and interpretations. There is a similar emphasis on the unity of all people, openly rejecting notions of racism and nationalism. At the heart of Bahá'í teachings is the goal of a unified world order that ensures the prosperity of all nations, races, creeds, and classes.[6][7]

Wow - that sounds awesome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonglow
...There is the upside as well and the more research is done showing the benefits of such practices as meditation and mindfulness.

Along with this, psychology gets thrown in the mix as well as nutritional health.
Not saying it is a bad thing necessarily, just can be confusing as to what one "should" be doing to obtain balance in ones life or spiritual connection.

Would say follow one heart and do the research. Find what works for you and not necessarily what is marketed out there as being the answer...
Sage advice Moonglow.

I agree, it does cover a lot of territory, though very unevenly. It's almost the Wikipedia of spirit.
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  #15  
Old 22-09-2017, 03:27 AM
Shivani Devi Shivani Devi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky 1
much of what is being talked about as "new age' sounds to me like a fair amount of recycled hinduism....
Exactly...and not recycled very well at that.
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  #16  
Old 22-09-2017, 03:31 AM
Shivani Devi Shivani Devi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shivatar
In every age of great activity in human history there has been a "new group" and an "old group".

The tendency of the old group is to say "the new one is too young to know what they are talking about, we have stood the test of time, we know what we are talking about".

And the tendency of the new group is the attitude of the rebel, it often suggests we challenge what we have come to accept as true. it challenges dogmas.



From what I've heard about new age beliefs is they are a conglomeration of beliefs and ideas that began in the early 20th century and came from a few influential thinkers at that time. One of the big ones I hear is carlos castenada. I guess a lot of new age beliefs are derived from his writings.

One big complaint I hear is that the new age beliefs are not structured. Religion is highly structured.

many people who turn to new age and enjoy it's lack of structure are people who have been wronged in some way by religion.
I blame the Theosophists for all of it and in particular, Arthur Avalon (Sir John Woodroffe).

What the "New Age" did to Tantra...we shall not go there.
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  #17  
Old 22-09-2017, 06:34 AM
Lorelyen Lorelyen is offline
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One naughty shaman who's explored the new age outpourings (Ross Heaven) (on the web - Shamanarchist)

"I’ve been called many things, some of them with only four letters, and many of them not very flattering....................
..............It’s amazing the projections people have and how they get repeated ad nausea by people who, again, haven’t done the slightest bit of research themselves.

In fairness to these opinionated souls, I am a murderer of all sorts of sacred cows, a shatterer of false idols and illusions, a whistle-blower on frauds and fakers, so I guess that does make me controversial since so many ‘newagers’ and ‘weekend warriors’ are happy to simply toe the party line and believe any old carp (misprint) they’re told – including the newage (in my vocabulary this word rhymes with sewage)"


Not sure if he still does, he used to live just a few miles down the road from me.
He isn't a likeable person, remembered for trying to scrap his contraite with his Vodou maman / Mambo. A bit flighty to say the least.
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  #18  
Old 22-09-2017, 06:38 AM
Lorelyen Lorelyen is offline
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As for being a traditionalist I had to somehow merge my interest
in Hermtic with neo-African beliefs (Vodou rather than those closer to Yuruba roots)
and both with my own Gnostic findings and, inter alia serious work
with psychedelics 15-20 years ago.

The latter helped by having parents who had been through the 60s thing.
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  #19  
Old 22-09-2017, 06:48 AM
Lorelyen Lorelyen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kioma
Pandas can play the piano?

There are alternative responses

1) Of course they can!

2) Go away (or words to that effect) preferably the latter. If I used the terms
I'd be banned but they end in 'off'.

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  #20  
Old 22-09-2017, 06:58 AM
Snow Goose Snow Goose is offline
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Posts: 507
 
Well as far as I'm aware the new age got its name from he 'new age' of aquarius.

I wouldn't class myself as new age, I see it as being superficial but that's just my take on it. I grew up with a new ager and I seen her as very superficial so it be due to mother issues ;-)

She would make lots of money holding tarot reading parties or would be on those chatlines for tarot readings. I thought she was a pretty rubbish tarot reader tbh.

Also she was a reiki master, not the she ever done any healing with anyone it was so she could do group reiki 1/2 courses and make a mint doing it.

There were Buddha heads and charkra charts all over the house but she never actually done any work on herself.

One positive thing I like about the new agers is that they are charging places like stonehenge with all the energy they are putting into the area and that's all good!

Wicca is definitely not ancient either, some say it was developed by Alister Crowley to catch those who are interested in the occult but maybe don't have the best intensions.
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