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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Spirituality & Beliefs > Meditation

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  #11  
Old 18-09-2017, 03:06 PM
Bindu* Bindu* is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A human Being
Anyone done it? I heard about it from Leo on actualized.org and I've heard that you can make a lot of progress in a relatively short period of time, so I want to give it a go (for anyone who isn't familiar with the concept, it's basically sitting for long periods of time, staying as still and relaxed as possible). I've been meditating for about four years now but rarely for more than thirty minutes at a time, so I'm building up to it - I'm currently doing one-hour sitting three times a day, and even that is proving quite challenging atm. I'm eager to increase the length of the sittings but at the same time I don't want to burn myself out, does anyone have any general outlines for how much and how quickly to increase the duration of the sittings? Anyone care to share their experiences and outline the benefits and pitfalls of doing SDS?

Yeah...keep it going while the inspiration lasts

My meditation practice is a rollercoaster.

Trying to uphold a minimum 20 minutes a day practice, in order to have the process going, whatever resistence there is.

When inspiration is there, or in a retreat mood, I sit longer.

Discipline is not always there. But the aim of enlightenment is cemented.
So some days just doing some mantra repetition or chanting some Kirtan will do.

Being on a path of grace. I think sometimes the intention is more important than the practice.

But that's me.....

Om Shanti
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  #12  
Old 18-09-2017, 04:01 PM
Bubbles Bubbles is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A human Being
Yeah, I mean meditation when I talk about sitting. I'm intrigued, when you say you divide a thought up, how do you do that exactly?


when i meditate, first 20 minutes or so.. a lot of mind chatter.. although I try to think of nothing, thoughts still come. it's like waves.. not thinking, thinking etc.. all this mind chatter... but after 40 minutes... it gets more quiet. you see if for example i want to think of why i have X problem, usually i'd be bombarded with reasons, justifications, rationalizing thoughts, emotions... all these clouding my judgement to a certain extent (valid for everyone). but when i am on the 40+ minute mark of my sitting, i get easily into a thought-loop, meaning I have this X problem, and I can clearly see a couple of reasons for this X problem, then without all the mind chatter disturbing me, I can see the cause of those couple of reasons, then i pick one reason and see what made me do it etc... in short, going to the root of the roots. this is what i mean about what you asked.

but im not just meditating to think of problems, that's just a part. sometimes i just meditate for that state. with meditation music on headphones... in 1 hour I am 'gone' really far to the point where I don't even feel like i am in my body or in that room ha :) i'm just saying, 20 minutes meditation is good for mood, but 1 hour+ is amazing :)
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  #13  
Old 19-09-2017, 01:21 AM
shivatar shivatar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A human Being
Anyone done it? I heard about it from Leo on actualized.org and I've heard that you can make a lot of progress in a relatively short period of time, so I want to give it a go (for anyone who isn't familiar with the concept, it's basically sitting for long periods of time, staying as still and relaxed as possible). I've been meditating for about four years now but rarely for more than thirty minutes at a time, so I'm building up to it - I'm currently doing one-hour sitting three times a day, and even that is proving quite challenging atm. I'm eager to increase the length of the sittings but at the same time I don't want to burn myself out, does anyone have any general outlines for how much and how quickly to increase the duration of the sittings? Anyone care to share their experiences and outline the benefits and pitfalls of doing SDS?

Hardcore determination. Wanting to stand up is a craving of the mind that can be overcome by going deeper into meditation.

In deep meditation there won't be an urge to stand. Meditate until you get the urge to stand, then begin to chant or ask yourself "go deeper". Keep doing that until the urge to stand goes away, then you'll be able to recognize you are in a deep state of meditation by the lack of bodily desires.

In other words, don't try to keep doing a low level and ineffective meditation for longer periods of time. Go deeper into meditation as you increase the length of time spent in meditation. That is the point after all, not to take it slow.
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  #14  
Old 19-09-2017, 12:54 PM
A human Being A human Being is offline
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Thanks to everyone for your input :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gem
Strong determination sittings are usually practiced as remaining seated and motionless, for an hour duration. Your routine of 3 times daily is very good. It is sensible to be reasonably moderate, as you say, and 3 one hour determination sittings is probably as reasonable as it gets. If eager to add to add to the duration, then might as well, as you could make a 75 or 90 minute sit for any one of your meditation periods.
Yeah it feels about right for me at the moment, I'm pushing myself without risking burn-out. Most important thing is to simply stick with it, I think, it's hardest in the beginning it seems.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bindu*
Yeah...keep it going while the inspiration lasts

My meditation practice is a rollercoaster.

Trying to uphold a minimum 20 minutes a day practice, in order to have the process going, whatever resistence there is.

When inspiration is there, or in a retreat mood, I sit longer.

Discipline is not always there. But the aim of enlightenment is cemented.
So some days just doing some mantra repetition or chanting some Kirtan will do.

Being on a path of grace. I think sometimes the intention is more important than the practice.

But that's me.....

Om Shanti
Namaste :)

Mm, the bit in bold - I'd say the intention is as important as the practice. As far as discipline goes, I think it's important but at the same time it's important to stay attentive to your needs, if you feel the need of a rest then I say have a rest. Though self-honesty's everything, there's a difference between actually needing to go easy on yourself and just being lazy (general point, btw, I'm not accusing you of laziness!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubbles
when i meditate, first 20 minutes or so.. a lot of mind chatter.. although I try to think of nothing, thoughts still come. it's like waves.. not thinking, thinking etc.. all this mind chatter... but after 40 minutes... it gets more quiet. you see if for example i want to think of why i have X problem, usually i'd be bombarded with reasons, justifications, rationalizing thoughts, emotions... all these clouding my judgement to a certain extent (valid for everyone). but when i am on the 40+ minute mark of my sitting, i get easily into a thought-loop, meaning I have this X problem, and I can clearly see a couple of reasons for this X problem, then without all the mind chatter disturbing me, I can see the cause of those couple of reasons, then i pick one reason and see what made me do it etc... in short, going to the root of the roots. this is what i mean about what you asked.

but im not just meditating to think of problems, that's just a part. sometimes i just meditate for that state. with meditation music on headphones... in 1 hour I am 'gone' really far to the point where I don't even feel like i am in my body or in that room ha :) i'm just saying, 20 minutes meditation is good for mood, but 1 hour+ is amazing :)
Ah ok, so the deeper you go into your meditation, the clearer your thinking becomes - thanks for the explanation :) In my case, I generally just notice the thoughts arising and I let them pass, return my attention to my felt experience. If I notice a particular thought reoccurring, I try to pinpoint a particular sensation in the body that's connected to the thought and give my full attention to that, go more deeply into the feeling.
Quote:
Originally Posted by shivatar
Hardcore determination. Wanting to stand up is a craving of the mind that can be overcome by going deeper into meditation.

In deep meditation there won't be an urge to stand. Meditate until you get the urge to stand, then begin to chant or ask yourself "go deeper". Keep doing that until the urge to stand goes away, then you'll be able to recognize you are in a deep state of meditation by the lack of bodily desires.

In other words, don't try to keep doing a low level and ineffective meditation for longer periods of time. Go deeper into meditation as you increase the length of time spent in meditation. That is the point after all, not to take it slow.
Thanks for the suggestions, I'll keep them in mind :) At times I do get quite a strong urge to stand up, stop the meditation, but recently I've taken to bringing my attention to the accompanying sensation in the body that's linked to that urge (seems to be in my heart, it's a feeling of, 'I can't do this, I give up!') and then, as I say, I just sit with the feeling. So my meditation practice is basically about becoming more conscious of and attentive to my felt experience, and releasing whatever's being held on to.
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  #15  
Old 20-09-2017, 01:04 AM
Gem Gem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A human Being
Thanks to everyone for your input :)

Yeah it feels about right for me at the moment, I'm pushing myself without risking burn-out. Most important thing is to simply stick with it, I think, it's hardest in the beginning it seems.

Yep motionless sitting for an hour is hard to do, but it's good for learning the mind's reactionary tendencies and building strong equanimity. In terms of the healing or purification process, it can raise emotional blocks, which might make people a little sensitive, so one has to be careful of their 'triggers' when relating with other people.

Quote:
Namaste :)

Mm, the bit in bold - I'd say the intention is as important as the practice. As far as discipline goes, I think it's important but at the same time it's important to stay attentive to your needs, if you feel the need of a rest then I say have a rest. Though self-honesty's everything, there's a difference between actually needing to go easy on yourself and just being lazy (general point, btw, I'm not accusing you of laziness!).


Ah ok, so the deeper you go into your meditation, the clearer your thinking becomes - thanks for the explanation :) In my case, I generally just notice the thoughts arising and I let them pass, return my attention to my felt experience. If I notice a particular thought reoccurring, I try to pinpoint a particular sensation in the body that's connected to the thought and give my full attention to that, go more deeply into the feeling.

Thanks for the suggestions, I'll keep them in mind :) At times I do get quite a strong urge to stand up, stop the meditation, but recently I've taken to bringing my attention to the accompanying sensation in the body that's linked to that urge (seems to be in my heart, it's a feeling of, 'I can't do this, I give up!') and then, as I say, I just sit with the feeling. So my meditation practice is basically about becoming more conscious of and attentive to my felt experience, and releasing whatever's being held on to.

Good practice. We just have to be aware so we don't give too much importance to a particular thought/emotion/sensation/experience, as in the meditation these are all equal by virtue of their impermanence. The practice is always the balanced, still, equanimity of the observational mind - without intents based in aversions to some things and desires for other things. I think it's particularly important to notice the adverse quality toward the things we want to 'get rid of' or 'release' - as we really work toward not entering into adverse states of mind, rather than working toward purifying by any force of will. In a constant attitude of 'this is how the experience is', come pleasure, come pain, nothing can disturb the quietude of observation.
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  #16  
Old 20-09-2017, 12:07 PM
A human Being A human Being is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gem
Yep motionless sitting for an hour is hard to do, but it's good for learning the mind's reactionary tendencies and building strong equanimity. In terms of the healing or purification process, it can raise emotional blocks, which might make people a little sensitive, so one has to be careful of their 'triggers' when relating with other people.
Not easy but definitely worth the effort, yeah, I'm on my sixth day of longer sittings and I'm already feeling the benefits. Made me chuckle, what you said about raising emotional blocks, because people new to meditation might have this image in their minds of a serene, perfectly tranquil meditator in the lotus position, but in reality it's had the effect of making me feel murderous with rage at times The releasing of previously repressed material is all part of the purification process, though, so it is a positive development even if it doesn't feel like it (though obviously self-control is important, as is self-care - best not to subject yourself to people and situations that are going to trigger you when you're feeling hyper-sensitive, for example).
Quote:
Good practice. We just have to be aware so we don't give too much importance to a particular thought/emotion/sensation/experience, as in the meditation these are all equal by virtue of their impermanence. The practice is always the balanced, still, equanimity of the observational mind - without intents based in aversions to some things and desires for other things. I think it's particularly important to notice the adverse quality toward the things we want to 'get rid of' or 'release' - as we really work toward not entering into adverse states of mind, rather than working toward purifying by any force of will. In a constant attitude of 'this is how the experience is', come pleasure, come pain, nothing can disturb the quietude of observation.
Excellent point, yeah. There is a danger that we can fixate on certain sensations, try to work them out, get rid of them, etc., when as you say it's about dispassionate observation and not manipulation. Release happens on its own, you can't force it.
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  #17  
Old 20-09-2017, 06:11 PM
In Flux In Flux is offline
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Thanks for posting, I've been trying it out yesterday and today, and felt a bit more calm and alert during the meditation (and after). I'm looking forward to trying it out further.
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  #18  
Old 20-09-2017, 10:08 PM
A human Being A human Being is offline
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Originally Posted by In Flux
Thanks for posting, I've been trying it out yesterday and today, and felt a bit more calm and alert during the meditation (and after). I'm looking forward to trying it out further.
You're welcome, and I'm glad you've felt some benefits already - yeah, stick with it, it does test your determination but it's definitely worth it imo :)
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  #19  
Old 21-09-2017, 05:50 AM
Gem Gem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A human Being
Not easy but definitely worth the effort, yeah, I'm on my sixth day of longer sittings and I'm already feeling the benefits. Made me chuckle, what you said about raising emotional blocks, because people new to meditation might have this image in their minds of a serene, perfectly tranquil meditator in the lotus position, but in reality it's had the effect of making me feel murderous with rage at times The releasing of previously repressed material is all part of the purification process, though, so it is a positive development even if it doesn't feel like it (though obviously self-control is important, as is self-care - best not to subject yourself to people and situations that are going to trigger you when you're feeling hyper-sensitive, for example).

Well meditation is a purification process, as it isn't like we need to be more loving, only that we need to address the obstacles that restrict the free flow of universal love. Rather than an aversion toward such obstacles, and a craving to be rid of them, this pertains to the truth of our nature and how we restrict ourselves from the full expression thereof. We all do that to some degree of another, and we all have this sort of life issue, so it isn't a 'bad thing' - its just how human beings survive. Our recourse is to build upon that resilience, the ability to withstand the intensity of experience, without losing the plot, and maintaining that sensitive balance of the mind. In a determined practice like you describe, experience will become intense, often significant pain in the body, sometimes deep meditational states, but the practice itself is always keeping that silent observation regardless of the experience unfolding. This builds a stable equanimity, which enables the purification process. With stabler balance of equanimity, one can withstand higher intensities, so the purification can accelerate and deepen.



Quote:
Excellent point, yeah. There is a danger that we can fixate on certain sensations, try to work them out, get rid of them, etc., when as you say it's about dispassionate observation and not manipulation. Release happens on its own, you can't force it.

Yes, you can work on the ability to maintain stillness, stability, equanimity. That's meditation. The desire to get rid of stuff (aka aversion) won't work because desire/aversion disrupts equanimity - and equanimity is the key. Hence it shouldn't matter if a block is there or not, because it doesn't. It just happens to be that way and it's the truth of 'yourself'. Of course it can't stay the same, and will inevitably change, so equanimity is the same as being at peace with change, and being at peace with change is the same as 'allowing it' - but without implying you have a choice or control over what is already observably 'the way it is'.
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  #20  
Old 21-09-2017, 11:49 AM
Miss Hepburn Miss Hepburn is offline
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Originally Posted by A human Being
Anyone done it? ... so I'm building up to it - I'm currently doing one-hour sitting three times a day...
Anyone care to share their experiences and outline the benefits and pitfalls of doing SDS?
I, um, don't think I should share my experiences.
But since I sit for 3 - 6 hours a session...for over 40 years...you may see why.
May I say...when you are doing something you love...there is no real effort.
Do you have to tie yourself down to lay on a beach and absorb the smells and sounds of the ocean?
No.
Love what you do.
Love that thing that you are placing your focus on...find that thing that fills your heart and never ends...was there
before you were born and is making your fingernails grow as you sleep.
Then, try and tear yourself away for things in this world...Try!
It would be like leaving the bed of your lover.

If one has nothing to focus on that excites them and calls them back
for more...something is 'off'....I dunno the best word....not 'great'?
If you need suggestions tell me and I can pm you.
Hope you are doing great in your life. xo
Ever see our friend Hayley?
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Through delusion you are perceiving yourself as a bundle of flesh and bones...
Meditate unceasingly, that you quickly behold yourself as the Infinite Essence"

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