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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Religions & Faiths > Paganism

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  #1  
Old 16-08-2017, 04:17 PM
huli.tea huli.tea is offline
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Book1 Druidry as a non-Celt?

Hi! (Sorry if this is in the wrong place.)

So I've been looking into Druidry recently and it perfectly encompasses something I wish to follow (Wicca being a very close second).
So from what I've read the belief system mainly draws from Celtic and British roots.

Which is awesome and all, but as an African-American who knows near nothing about her family history,
I find it hard for me to be a part of something which my ancestors probably weren't a part of.
And even though I remember reading that I don't have to be a Celt to be a Druid,
I still feel like if I don't have a drop of Celtic blood in me then I shouldn't even bother.

I don't want to feel like I'm doing the "cultural appropriation" thing.

None of the African religions really appeal to me either.

Is there some kind of alternative or should I just look elsewhere?

Thanks!
~ huli.tea
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  #2  
Old 16-08-2017, 04:24 PM
Native spirit Native spirit is offline
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Go with what feels right for you

Namaste
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  #3  
Old 16-08-2017, 06:30 PM
Chrysalis Chrysalis is offline
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Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huli.tea
Hi! (Sorry if this is in the wrong place.)

So I've been looking into Druidry recently and it perfectly encompasses something I wish to follow (Wicca being a very close second).
So from what I've read the belief system mainly draws from Celtic and British roots.

Which is awesome and all, but as an African-American who knows near nothing about her family history,
I find it hard for me to be a part of something which my ancestors probably weren't a part of.
And even though I remember reading that I don't have to be a Celt to be a Druid,
I still feel like if I don't have a drop of Celtic blood in me then I shouldn't even bother.

I don't want to feel like I'm doing the "cultural appropriation" thing.

None of the African religions really appeal to me either.

Is there some kind of alternative or should I just look elsewhere?

Thanks!
~ huli.tea

Hi huli.tea

I've read a bit of neoDruidry and it seems that it's acceptable to self-identify as a Druid. If you feel really drawn to it, I see no problem. I think the trouble begins if you call yourself a Celt when you're not one becomes a cultural appropriation. Most of what they say about Druidry is what can be gleaned from Celtic myth and legend which is why there's a heavy emphasis on it. The rest is made up to fill in far too many blanks. Historically speaking, there's nothing to really support exactly what the Druids did so neoDruidry contains a mix of modern invention with what was gleaned from history, archaeology, myth, legend, etc.

Some people have combined two different beliefs as a way of self-identification, such as Christian Druid. In your particular situation I look back on history and the Irish people were enslaved too but called indentured servants. With such a strong pull, or urge, towards Druidry, I suspect you might have an Irish ancestor in your genealogy.

As for me, I self-identified with Druidry but heavy emphasis on being an Ovate Druid as that's where most of my talents lay and, of course, there's a bit of overlapping with Bard (creative) and Druid (teacher).

Wish you the best on your spiritual journey.
__________________
But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee; and the fowls of the air, and they shall tell thee:

Or speak to the earth, and it shall teach thee: and the fishes of the sea shall declare unto thee.

Job 12: 7 and 8 (KJV)
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  #4  
Old 23-08-2017, 03:07 AM
huli.tea huli.tea is offline
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Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 6
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrysalis
Hi huli.tea

I've read a bit of neoDruidry and it seems that it's acceptable to self-identify as a Druid. If you feel really drawn to it, I see no problem. I think the trouble begins if you call yourself a Celt when you're not one becomes a cultural appropriation. Most of what they say about Druidry is what can be gleaned from Celtic myth and legend which is why there's a heavy emphasis on it. The rest is made up to fill in far too many blanks. Historically speaking, there's nothing to really support exactly what the Druids did so neoDruidry contains a mix of modern invention with what was gleaned from history, archaeology, myth, legend, etc.

Some people have combined two different beliefs as a way of self-identification, such as Christian Druid. In your particular situation I look back on history and the Irish people were enslaved too but called indentured servants. With such a strong pull, or urge, towards Druidry, I suspect you might have an Irish ancestor in your genealogy.

As for me, I self-identified with Druidry but heavy emphasis on being an Ovate Druid as that's where most of my talents lay and, of course, there's a bit of overlapping with Bard (creative) and Druid (teacher).

Wish you the best on your spiritual journey.

Wow, I never thought of all that. That's pretty helpful, thank you!
I'll definitely consider what you said.

huli.tea
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  #5  
Old 23-08-2017, 09:01 PM
DaughterofDanu DaughterofDanu is offline
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Druidry can be practiced without focusing on Celtic deities. Paths like the OBOD allow you to worship whichever deities you wish.

As to it being cultural appropriation if it's an important topic to you, you wouldn't be appropriating as Druidry is not a closed culture thing. The original Druids died out long ago, and anyone is welcome to follow it and/or worship Celtic deities if they so please. While most people are drawn to it as they feel it connects them with their heritage, all the big Druidry organizations explicitly discuss accepting everyone regardless of their gender, race, sexual orientation. You're welcome to explore Druidry, as is everyone :) We're a spirituality that focuses on helping nature and mankind afterall.

Also Wicca and Druidry are very similar in quite a few ways, even their founders were friends. There's a path called Druidcraft that incorporates both. If you look into Druidcraft you'll find there's a book of the same name that helps you learn about it and get started.

If you have any questions I'd be happy to help as best I can :)
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