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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Complementary Therapies & Traditional Medicine > Hypnosis

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  #21  
Old 03-07-2011, 08:41 PM
Aquarian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvergirl
I know anything is possible or so they say...so could this (highlighted blue) account for some people's belief that they were possibly abducted by aliens?
In the 90s, lots of memories of sexual abuse were found through hypnosis. Only the abuse never happened.

The causes ranged from 'direct' suggestions such as "go back and remember being abused" to 'indirect' pre-induction talk eg "we've found lots of people with repressed memories of being abused so we're going to hypnotise you".

The mind is quite capable of creating plausible events that never happened eg dreaming.

So when expected to, the mind comes up with something that seems like a plausible memory.

This is quite different from motorway trances. Driving on a motorway fully conscious is both tiring and boring so the mind adapts a more suitable state. It does not make the mind more suggestible or more likely to hallucinate (probably less likely).

So I'd say no. The phenomenon of self-reported alien abduction is almost unheard of in Britain and most of the world as far as I know.

I've never met anyone who claimed to be abducted.

But I was always taught that, however outrageous the claims of a client, one should consider the possibility that they're true.

Quote:
I only once had hypnotherapy years ago for weight loss, but it made my stomach feel funny / uncomfortable, so I didn't go back after once or twice. What about its use here and now for such things as smoking cessation and weight loss? How effective is it, really?
It is more of an art form than a method. It's like asking how good films are in general.

Smoking cessation is the more straightforward of these problems. You have both cravings and habitual choosing to smoke.

I've only found one method that's effective for cravings - EFT. You can do it with NLP anchoring but that takes rare skill and possibly hours. I've read many reports of ex-smokers saying the cravings are still there after 20 years.

Changing the decision to smoke is simply repeated mental rehearsal of how an ex-smoker would think about smoking ie resolve, distaste and a clear understanding of why they don't want to smoke.

Weight loss is another matter. Even the medical profession is clueless about the major factors that cause it.
eg after the age of 30, people's metabolism typically drops like a stone. This is due to a drop in the release of growth hormone (the same thing they give short kids).
After this time, exercise does almost nothing for weight loss (there are exceptions).

So there are 2 options, eat far less or take growth hormone precursors.

For the former, you need clients to completely change their relationship with food ie a re-imprint. Hypnosis is practically inevitable here.
Hypnosis can also be used to boost metabolism.

It's perhaps easiest to think of hypnotherapy as an amplifier of experience, but it can be used to bypass everyday self-doubt. It cannot do anything that people can't do on eg their best day in ten years.

Feel free to ask more questions.

Interesting news on Stroop test, Krishna.
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  #22  
Old 03-07-2011, 08:52 PM
Silver Silver is offline
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Quote:
Orig. quoted by Aquarian ~ Weight loss is another matter. Even the medical profession is clueless about the major factors that cause it.
eg after the age of 30, people's metabolism typically drops like a stone. This is due to a drop in the release of growth hormone (the same thing they give short kids).
After this time, exercise does almost nothing for weight loss (there are exceptions).

So there are 2 options, eat far less or take growth hormone precursors.

For the former, you need clients to completely change their relationship with food ie a re-imprint. Hypnosis is practically inevitable here.
Hypnosis can also be used to boost metabolism.


Yes, I'm onto that eating far less, it still does almost nothing for me, sad to say.
So, are growth hormone precursors hard to come by (does it take a prescription)?
How hard would it be to search for a good hypnotherapist who can perform this food - relationship and metabolism boost therapy?
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  #23  
Old 04-07-2011, 12:07 AM
Aquarian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvergirl
Yes, I'm onto that eating far less, it still does almost nothing for me, sad to say.
I'm eating a third of what I used to and struggling with my weight more than ever. Just a few pounds, but not used to it.

Quote:
So, are growth hormone precursors hard to come by (does it take a prescription)?
No easy, in every health/fitness store. There are 2:
arginine - a simple amino acid. You have to take quite a lot in powdered form.
niacin - one of the B vitamins. Causes niacin flush which means it isn't suitable for public exercise.

Because the slimming function of growth hormone is to turn fat into muscle, exercise makes it work 3 or 4 times better.

Arginine has a much stronger effect and niacin is dirt cheap.

Quote:
How hard would it be to search for a good hypnotherapist who can perform this food - relationship and metabolism boost therapy?

It's incredibly unlikely that they'd know what to do. You could explain to them what kind of suggestions you want.

Boosting metabolism means burning more calories. It has to go somewhere which generally means either fidgeting or keeping your body warm.

The latter, if 24 hours a day, actually works better than regular exercise for those lacking growth hormone. You can also encourage it by simply using gradually thinner duvets.

Changing one's relationship to food could probably done through meditation.
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  #24  
Old 04-07-2011, 12:35 AM
Silver Silver is offline
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Where can I find the best guidelines as to how much niacin and arginine to take?

I take amino acids gel caps 1X a day presently, sometimes 2X, but you say it s/b powder form. Just need to know how much for purposes of weight loss and if the gel cap form is ok.

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  #25  
Old 04-07-2011, 11:34 PM
Aquarian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvergirl
Where can I find the best guidelines as to how much niacin and arginine to take?

I take amino acids gel caps 1X a day presently, sometimes 2X, but you say it s/b powder form. Just need to know how much for purposes of weight loss and if the gel cap form is ok.

Niacin, start at 100mg and build up to 200. More info.

Arginine, never done it but you have to take probably 10,000x what you'd get in a gel cap ... http://www.futurescience.com/arginine.html
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  #26  
Old 04-07-2011, 11:42 PM
Silver Silver is offline
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Thx for the links~*
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  #27  
Old 05-07-2011, 12:49 AM
jjj
Posts: n/a
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquarian
In the 90s, lots of memories of sexual abuse were found through hypnosis. Only the abuse never happened.
The therapist with an agenda. Did you know that the beginning of the "false memory syndrome" originated with the parents of someone who truly did remember her early sexual abuse (a Clinical Psychology intern)? Then this 'phenomena' was exploited by a "therapist" with an agenda who (strangely enough) suddenly remembered her own abuse and had to back-track her "work"/ agenda a bit. As someone who works with trauma, I am very concerned with the damage that her work did to people who could possibly get help if not for this type of exploitation. And... as someone who is a sexual abuse/ incest survivor I am glad that I had ONE memory to begin with. If not, I would never believe that it happened... and I can't imagine how invalidating that would have been and I don't believe there would have been a possibility of recovery. :)

http://www.jimhopper.com/memory/
Quote:
The causes ranged from 'direct' suggestions such as "go back and remember being abused" to 'indirect' pre-induction talk eg "we've found lots of people with repressed memories of being abused so we're going to hypnotise you".

The mind is quite capable of creating plausible events that never happened eg dreaming.

So when expected to, the mind comes up with something that seems like a plausible memory.

This is quite different from motorway trances. Driving on a motorway fully conscious is both tiring and boring so the mind adapts a more suitable state. It does not make the mind more suggestible or more likely to hallucinate (probably less likely).

So I'd say no. The phenomenon of self-reported alien abduction is almost unheard of in Britain and most of the world as far as I know.

I've never met anyone who claimed to be abducted.

But I was always taught that, however outrageous the claims of a client, one should consider the possibility that they're true.


It is more of an art form than a method. It's like asking how good films are in general.

Smoking cessation is the more straightforward of these problems. You have both cravings and habitual choosing to smoke.

I've only found one method that's effective for cravings - EFT. You can do it with NLP anchoring but that takes rare skill and possibly hours. I've read many reports of ex-smokers saying the cravings are still there after 20 years.

Changing the decision to smoke is simply repeated mental rehearsal of how an ex-smoker would think about smoking ie resolve, distaste and a clear understanding of why they don't want to smoke.

Weight loss is another matter. Even the medical profession is clueless about the major factors that cause it.
eg after the age of 30, people's metabolism typically drops like a stone. This is due to a drop in the release of growth hormone (the same thing they give short kids).
After this time, exercise does almost nothing for weight loss (there are exceptions).

So there are 2 options, eat far less or take growth hormone precursors.

For the former, you need clients to completely change their relationship with food ie a re-imprint. Hypnosis is practically inevitable here.
Hypnosis can also be used to boost metabolism.

It's perhaps easiest to think of hypnotherapy as an amplifier of experience, but it can be used to bypass everyday self-doubt. It cannot do anything that people can't do on eg their best day in ten years.

Feel free to ask more questions.

Interesting news on Stroop test, Krishna.

Interesting post, Aquarian (you'll excuse my soap box at the beginning... uhg... horrible damage done by certain 'work'... nothing like ENHANCING the **** the victim goes through on stand and off). As far as the program that I've been utilizing for weight release; it is not a diet program. It's actually targeting health so there is no ideal weight and a scale isn't used. However, hypnosis is used for the purpose of understanding the reasons that we may have an unhealthy relationship with food (eating disorders such as overeating, anorexia, and bulimia). Regression is used also to understand where the patterns originated and to heal at the source. Also, in trance to enhance the experience of getting in touch with the body and gauging hunger. And, of course suggestion. I 'feels' much healthier to me than any other program I have seen. It's that whole dialect between accepting oneself as you are and knowing that change is needed.
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  #28  
Old 16-07-2011, 11:47 AM
jjj
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Not trying to 'hog the board' but I do think this is important for therapists... and PARTICULARLY hypnotherapists to understand:

Elizabeth Loftus

University of Washington psychologist Elizabeth Loftus is an accomplished researcher with expertise in eyewitness testimony, particularly how the memories of crime witnesses can be distorted by post-event questioning. Loftus is a prominent spokesperson for the False Memory Syndrome Foundation, and her views have by and large been very well received by the mass media in the United States. Loftus also testifies as an expert witness on the behalf of people accused of child abuse on the basis of recovered memories. She has co-authored a book entitled The Myth of Repressed Memory.
You've probably heard of Dr. Loftus, and seen her quoted approvingly and uncritically in the popular media. No doubt, as reported in the media, she has prevented some wrongly accused people from being unjustly convicted. She has also played a valuable role by bringing attention and accountability to bear on some irresponsible practices by some incompetent therapists. Yet Dr. Loftus has also claimed that recovered memory is a "myth," and that the majority of such memories are false and implanted by therapists.
Unfortunately, thus far reporters and journalists have almost completely failed to critically evaluate her claims. Nor have they addressed three crucial facts about her work:

1. Loftus herself conducted and published a study in which nearly one in five women who reported childhood sexual abuse also reported completely forgetting the abuse for some period of time and recovering the memory of it later.

2. Loftus misrepresented the facts of a legal case in a scholarly paper and, after finally apologizing to the victim of her misrepresentations, continued to promote the article with falsehoods. (See Consider the Evidence for Elizabeth Loftus' Scholarship and Accuracy, by Jennifer Hoult, whose case Loftus misrepresented.)

3. Loftus is aware that those who study traumatic memory have for several years, based on a great deal of research and clinical experience, used the construct of dissociation to account for the majority of recovered memories. However, she continues to focus on and attack "repression" and "repressed memories," which has the effect of confusing and misleading many people.

Here is the study almost never mentioned by Dr. Loftus or the media:

Loftus, E.F., Polonsky, S., & Fullilove, M. T. (1994). Memories of childhood sexual abuse: Remembering and repressing. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 18, 67-845.

Abstract: "Women involved in out-patient treatment for substance abuse were interviewed to examine their recollections of childhood sexual abuse. Overall, 54% of the women reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. The majority (81.1%) remembered all or part of the abuse their whole lives; 19% reported they forgot the abuse for a period of time, and later the memory returned. Women who remembered the abuse their whole lives reported a clearer memory, with a more detailed picture. They also reported greater intensity of feelings at the time the abuse happened. Women who remembered the abuse their whole lives did not differ from others in terms of the violence of the abuse or whether the abuse was incestuous. These data bear on current discussions concerning the extent to which repression is a common way of coping with child sexual abuse trauma, and also bear on some widely held beliefs about the correlates of repression."

If you read this paper (and I strongly encourage you to do so, especially if you are presenting this issue to others), you will find that Loftus devotes most of it to attacking the construct of repression. If you read this paper, you will probably find it interesting and ironic that Loftus, after her sustained attack on the construct of repression, uses it to explain the recovered memories of her own study's subjects. If you read this paper and some of the other works cited on this page, you will understand that experts in psychological trauma would not explain the recovered memories of her research subjects in that way, but in terms of dissociation.

Here are the findings at issue:

"Forgetting was associated with a different quality of memory, compared to those who did not forget. Forgetting was associated with a current memory that was deteriorated in some respects. The deteriorated memory was less clear; it contained less of a 'picture,' and the remembered intensity of feelings at the time of the abuse was less" (p.79).

Notice the use of the word "deteriorated" to describe memory characteristics that most trauma specialists would describe as "dissociative." The principle that initially whole memories deteriorate over time is derived from research on nontraumatic memory. In contrast, just as dissociation involves a fragmentation of experience during abuse, subsequent memories tend to appear as fragments too – from the beginning. Thus, if a subject had dissociated during the abuse experience, such fragmentation would likely cause her memory to be "less clear," and to involve less of a "picture." Further, dissociative fragmentation during abuse typically involves a defensive attempt to split (dis-associate) physical and emotional pain from one's conscious experience. This could explain the finding that the women who had forgotten for some time, compared to those who had not, remembered the intensity of their feelings being less during the abuse. But Loftus and her colleagues, understandably wedded to their traditional model of memory and either unable or unwilling to apply the construct of dissociation, can only characterize such memories as "deteriorated."

Ironically, this leads Loftus to use repression as an explanation for these lost memories – though no psychological trauma expert would do so:

"Suppose instead we define repression more conservatively. . . . Just under one fifth of the women reported that they forgot the abuse for a period of time and later regained the memory. One could argue that this means that robust repression was not especially prevalent in our sample" (p.80).

In summary:

* Loftus has conducted and published research which calls into question her public statements on recovered memories; her own study demonstrated that the conditions of amnesia and delayed recall for sexual abuse do exist.

* She has relentlessly attacked the construct of repression in her scholarly work, in her expert testimony to judges and juries, and in her statements to the media; this behavior causes many uninformed people to believe she is arguing that the conditions of amnesia and delayed recall for sexual abuse do not exist.

* She has misrepresented the facts of a legal case in a scholarly paper and, after finally apologizing to the victim of her misrepresentations, continued to promote the article riddled with falsehoods (see Consider the Evidence for Elizabeth Loftus' Scholarship and Accuracy)

* She is aware that experts on traumatic and recovered memories, when they do employ explanatory constructs, use dissociation much more than repression to understand these phenomena.

* She has used repression to explain recovered memories reported by subjects in her own research, though experts in traumatic memory would argue that they are more likely dissociative in nature.

* For most of you, this is the first time you are learning these facts, because most members of the popular media addressing this issue have note done their homework or made any of these facts known. (For more on the unreliability and poor track record of the popular media on this issue, see Mike Stanton's piece in the Columbia Journalism Review, U-Turn on Memory Lane).
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  #29  
Old 01-09-2011, 03:28 AM
Member
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I hypnotize myself all the time.
If I look ( long enough ) into the corner of the room where my wall touches the ceiling, I leave. I have no idea where I'm at or even who/what I am when this happens, all I know is it's very peaceful. Ironically this peace is probably a neurological defect caused by bad genetics.

I'm still awesome though, so whatevs
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  #30  
Old 01-09-2011, 07:01 AM
mattie
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Varies

Some are receptive to this & others arenít. A skilled therapist can test to see if one is a good candidate for it.
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