Spiritual Forums

Home


Donate!


Articles


CHAT!


Shop


 
Welcome to Spiritual Forums!.

We created this community for people from all backgrounds to discuss Spiritual, Paranormal, Metaphysical, Philosophical, Supernatural, and Esoteric subjects. From Astral Projection to Zen, all topics are welcome. We hope you enjoy your visits.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to most discussions and articles. By joining our free community you will be able to post messages, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos, and gain access to our Chat Rooms, Registration is fast, simple, and free, so please, join our community today! !

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, check our FAQs before contacting support. Please read our forum rules, since they are enforced by our volunteer staff. This will help you avoid any infractions and issues.

Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Religions & Faiths > Interfaith

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 01-03-2014, 04:23 PM
Lilyth Von Gore Lilyth Von Gore is offline
Ascender
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Scotland
Posts: 859
  Lilyth Von Gore's Avatar
Interfaith relationships can and do work. I dated a Christian 4 years ago. I was Pagan, still am. We broke up not because faith got in the way but because we just fell out of love with each other. I've also dated an agnostic and a Wiccan. It does work.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-03-2014, 04:15 AM
EverySingleStar
Posts: n/a
 
My husband is Christian, I am Jewish. We have been married for under a year but together for two years. My husband is my soul mate, so sometimes your heart/soul chooses someone for you :) Does an interfaith relationship potentially cause extra 'stuff' to worry about and sort out? Sure. I would say we went through a period (before marriage) while we were engaged where we had a lot of disagreements over certain topics. Overall, I feel this was a great learning experience for me and also a lesson in compromise. It's difficult to sometimes come to terms that no, your kids won't only be your own background and your own religion (personally for me, and I know most Jewish people would feel the same, however this feeling is by no means exclusive to Jews as far as I know), but at the same time, I got over it eventually. I realized that religion is secondary to how I want to raise my kids, which is to be good people. My husband and I shared the same views on our goals in life, the overall role of religion in our lives, the importance of family, etc, and share many other similar social/political views, and considering how much we love each other, it didn't cross my mind to just step away because of a different religion. I first I just wanted it to be *my* way, but I am so thankful that I ended up changing my mind about that, because while I learned to be more accepting of the religious environment my children would be exposed to, I also became way more open and tolerant myself. I think having traditions and learning from two religions is a wonderful thing for kids AND adults, as long as everyone keeps an open mind! The only case where I see interfaith as being a bad idea is if both people are very religious and/or one or both are unwilling to compromise.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-06-2015, 12:03 AM
noxlumina noxlumina is offline
Experiencer
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 276
 
Depends upon how committed you are to your respective religions, and if the religion is one that tends to have exceptionalist or exclusive ideas about its practices/beliefs. Issues of identity can sometimes be wrapped up in religion.

My parents are a "spiritual not religious" secular Jewish woman and a "spiritual not religious" man of Christian origins. But my mom still had a strong sense of Jewish cultural identity and a strong identification with Jewish causes and issues, and still does, and ultimately this is part of why the marriage didn't work. But it didn't work for reasons that are more cultural/ethnic. He didn't understand, for example, why she wouldn't want to live in Saudi Arabia (where he almost took a job), and didn't "get it" about anti-Semitism.

She is now married to a man of similar secular Jewish origins, who is an agnostic or atheist, who is equally committed to Jewish cultural and political issues.

So yeah - I've seen religious couples make it work - but make sure that *even if you're both converted to a new religion, or you're both non-religious* - you have an understanding about the baggage that may come with each person's religious background. And respect each other!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-07-2015, 04:01 PM
celest
Posts: n/a
 
Of course interfaith marriages can work, if you love each other. I have a Christian who married a practising Muslim in my family and they have been happily married for 25 years. He goes to the mosque, she to church, no problem.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 20-01-2016, 05:46 AM
Yaakov001 Yaakov001 is offline
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 19
 
I am an Orthodox Jew. Granted, if you read some of my other posts you will note strong familiarity w/ Christianity. My wife is Lutheran. It works for us. We respect each other's right to be different. It's really that basic.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 22-01-2016, 06:47 PM
Moon_Glow Moon_Glow is offline
Master
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Over the river and through the woods...
Posts: 2,424
  Moon_Glow's Avatar
My mothers family is all Jewish and my father's father was a Baptist missionary who translated the Bible from language to language.

They have been married 30 years and I was raised with the most loving and accepting family (both sides).

It can work it all depends on who you are marrying. My parents are both more "spiritual" than religious - neither of them have practiced for any part of my life - they both claim to be "burnt out" on the religion thing from having so much of it forced on them during childhood.

My mom was also the only on in her family to NOT have a bat mitzvah... she's a bit of a black sheep.

As a child though I was told that whatever I want to learn about they will support... it gave me the opportunity to really search and learn about all religions/philosophies without having a cultural bias.
__________________
"We have no right to ask when sorrow comes 'Why did this happen to me?' unless we ask the same question for every joy that comes our way."

-Lord Rama to Laxman
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 31-03-2016, 05:25 PM
coelacanth coelacanth is offline
Knower
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 148
 
I'm the child of an interfaith marriage - my dad is Catholic and my mother is Jewish.

In my view, religious issues in marriage arise not from people being of different faiths, but differing in their level of zealousness for that faith. A fundamentalist Christian is going to have more trouble in an interfaith marriage than they would in a marriage with another fundamentalist Christian, for instance. This is especially true if the partner is similarly zealous about their faith and does not want to compromise, but exert their religion on the other as well. Even marriages between fundamentalist Christians and more liberal Christians can have conflicts arising from different interpretations of the Bible and different life priorities.

As for my parents, they were very secular to the point of being almost apathetic about their faith. They let me explore what I wanted, but never really wanted to introduce me to anything too "extreme." So in a lot of ways I grew up in a spiritual void. Growing up, I was the only one of my friends who was not involved in some kind of organized religion.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 31-03-2016, 05:26 PM
Moon_Glow Moon_Glow is offline
Master
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Over the river and through the woods...
Posts: 2,424
  Moon_Glow's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by coelacanth
I'm the child of an interfaith marriage - my dad is Catholic and my mother is Jewish.

In my view, religious issues in marriage arise not from people being of different faiths, but differing in their level of zealousness for that faith. A fundamentalist Christian is going to have more trouble in an interfaith marriage than they would in a marriage with another fundamentalist Christian, for instance. This is especially true if the partner is similarly zealous about their faith and does not want to compromise, but exert their religion on the other as well. Even marriages between fundamentalist Christians and more liberal Christians can have conflicts arising from different interpretations of the Bible and different life priorities.

As for my parents, they were very secular to the point of being almost apathetic about their faith. They let me explore what I wanted, but never really wanted to introduce me to anything too "extreme." So in a lot of ways I grew up in a spiritual void. Growing up, I was the only one of my friends who was not involved in some kind of organized religion.


I totally agree and grew up much in the same way
__________________
"We have no right to ask when sorrow comes 'Why did this happen to me?' unless we ask the same question for every joy that comes our way."

-Lord Rama to Laxman
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) Spiritual Forums