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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Complementary Therapies & Traditional Medicine > General

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  #21  
Old 08-02-2019, 11:20 PM
Sapphirez Sapphirez is offline
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This is a lovely thread!

I need to work on my green thumb myself.. but I do want to mention something that might be helpful for dealing with some plant and tree issues, and that is essential oils. of course it's important to research carefully before using because they are potent and powerful potions, but with a little time and understanding they can be life changing, for the plants they're used on and us humans as well.

another idea is using herbal waters to water them, all sorts of herbs and other gifts of nature can be used to help other parcels of nature


That is sweet what you've accomplished with your limited space, and fence emeraldheart. I hope you get your house soon too!

All of these fruit trees and vines sound amazing! I wish I had some, well there is a bit sour apple tree in the backyard here, and also a black walnut tree. I didn't try it from the fresh walnuts there but I tried black walnut hull tea recently and it is surprisingly delicious and a great replacement for coffee and such..

Thankfully my fiance's mom grew a big garden last year and hopefully will have one again this year, with my and my baby daughter's help too. She said there wasn't much she could grow when it comes to fruit though.. but we did get amazing watermelons last year, and there were also tons of tomatoes, okra, green peppers, and some spaghetti squash as the main plants of the two plots in their backyard. It is just breathtaking to have fresh garden-grown food all season!!
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  #22  
Old 06-03-2019, 01:09 AM
Elabr8Aspie Elabr8Aspie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emeraldheart
Houses are very expensive in my country but one day... one day.

Buy where you can afford,not where you want to live and one day will be here sooner than you think.
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  #23  
Old 06-03-2019, 02:32 AM
Rah nam Rah nam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tobi
I'll try that sort of mulch, blackraven. I can get a bag full.
But I still have a feeling my little tree needs more sunlight perhaps. There are many large trees round my garden, mostly outside of my garden on other land. There is a lot of light in Spring but in full summer, a lot of shade.


Something else perhaps, conifers like acidic condition, do you know what the soil conditions are in your area?
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  #24  
Old 09-03-2019, 02:00 PM
Lucky 1 Lucky 1 is offline
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Location: Texas Gulf Coast
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Not sure where all you guys live but here in Texas if you are having an issue with plants you can call your county agricultural extension agent (an expert) and tell him the probe and they will make recommendations at no cost.

I have mangoes in my back yard and a few years ago had problems with getting the fruit to set.

I called the country extension office and they said......oh thats a common problem with mangoes planted right on the coast.......you need such and such fertilizer and it'll fix that......and it did

Now every summer we have so many mangoes we almost can't give them away!
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  #25  
Old 16-05-2019, 09:22 PM
Found Goat Found Goat is offline
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It’s that time of the year again: A time for me to get up off my recliner, stretch my creaking bones, and to resist the urge to sit back down again.

There are flowers to be planted. There first is crusty soil to cultivate. There are garden gloves to soil and then put out to pasture.

All this is done not just to heave and to ho or to grow and to mow or to weed and to sow but to reap the invigorating reward that comes from spending time in the therapeutic act of beautifying the landscape.

Gardening, especially, can be a form of grounding in the meditational sense. Some have even gone so far as to equate it with a silent prayer. The past-time seems to have a calming effect on most who take up the trowel, while others would rather be doing anything else than bending down and getting one’s clothes dirty, when they’d rather be watching football or attending drag races.

In ancient times, philosophers would often gather their pupils around some quiet and secluded natural setting in which to teach as it was thought the sunlight and fresh air aided in stimulating one’s thinking abilities.

I recently took to re-watching a film I like: “Being There,” starring Peter Sellers. The actor plays a simple-minded gardener who is mistaken by a high-ranking politician for being a sapient. The protagonist is a man of few words but loves his flower pots and botanical buddies. In the movie’s closing shot, he is seen walking on water and the suggestion is made that this is a “super natural” man for his being so vernal and unworldly. This admirable man-child is certainly no “lord of nature.”

When I am out tending to a garden (I sometimes help out friends with theirs) I often think of whether plants are sensorial creatures on par with the animal world, as some think of them to be. Plant life is definitely precious as the process of photosynthesis clearly demonstrates. One book I read made the point that plants could easily survive without humans but that the opposite is not true. Gardening is just one way of showing the respect if not the reverence that is due these beings.

Springtime. There is nothing quite like it. A time for rock-hounds to come out from underneath their own rocks and when groundhogs have quit playing games with our weather reporters.

Here when nature-deprivation gives way to contact and the dryads and sprites of yore caress the morning dew and afternoon air with their enchanting anima.
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  #26  
Old 23-05-2019, 03:56 AM
Anala Anala is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hallow
I have a rose of Sharon that looks dead every spring until it warms up. I live in a little microenvironment. For example I work 9 miles from home. There was a 24° temp different been work and home. A 15° difference is more normal. I have many ginko seedlings all but that one is sprouting. For a plant type to survive over 200, million years I am sure it has a few survival tricks.

We have Rose of Sharon also. It is a very beautiful late bloomer. I think seeds are always smarter than me. And every year a plant pops up from the previous years seeds to prove the point.

This year it was garlic. My husband moved them because they did not thrive in the pallet garden, and well,... nothing came up,... until this spring, up pops something that looked like onions, but when we crushed a bit of leaf and we smelled garlic A very happy surprise!

We had snow and hail the last few days and freezing rain,.... but so far everything in the ground is doing well.

All the the seedlings are ready for the ground this weekend! I really want to try a cover crop between the plants of micro clover to choke out the weeds and provide nitrogen. Just a hair brained theory. Will have to find some seed first! Wish me luck!
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