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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Complementary Therapies & Traditional Medicine > Massage

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  #1  
Old 21-01-2017, 12:34 AM
Akh75 Akh75 is offline
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Massage therapist talking the whole time?

I'm curious to see what folks think of this.

I have a knack for getting massage therapists who talk through the entire massage. I don't do much to advance the conversation, just minimal responses ("Mhm." "Oh." "Huh."). I've been told it's probably because I'm very friendly... I don't enjoy being talked to the whole time. It takes away from the massage experience and it's not relaxing at all. I've come to the point where I ask before the massage if we can have it in complete silence.

How do others feel about this?
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  #2  
Old 21-01-2017, 01:16 AM
MysticAngel MysticAngel is offline
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Hi Akh75. I've been doing massage for almost 10 years and for a therapist to talk during the entire session is, in my opinion, not acceptable. However, that does seem to be what we call a "rookie" mistake. Most (not all) new therapist seem to do that. I usually leave that up to the client. I have regular clients that love to talk during the session so I let them lead the conversation. I also have clients that I've been working on once a month for the last 5 years and they don't say a word during the session. If you don't want to talk during the session then I don't see anything wrong with letting your therapist know that during the intake. I've actually had clients tell me before hand that they don't like to talk during the massage. My response is "that's ok. Neither do I" lol. Hope this helps :)
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  #3  
Old 21-01-2017, 08:52 AM
Inika Inika is offline
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You're paying for a therapy service. you have every right to not wish to engage in conversations during your therapy.
MOST therapists listen to the client and by that means body language also. You go with the cues of the client. This therapist may need to be directly told if she's missing the cues or is under the impression you want to have chats.

wishing you a silent and peaceful massage.
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  #4  
Old 21-01-2017, 09:03 PM
Clover Clover is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inika
You're paying for a therapy service. you have every right to not wish to engage in conversations during your therapy.
MOST therapists listen to the client and by that means body language also. You go with the cues of the client. This therapist may need to be directly told if she's missing the cues or is under the impression you want to have chats.

wishing you a silent and peaceful massage.


Good tip to know.

You know, I feel similarly when I am getting my hair done. I am getting a 'break' from home, I want to relax, I don't want to hear the beauticians life story nor my own, really I want to relax and sit. My hair is long so there is more time on the chair. A bit of a drag. Oh, I do love getting my scalp massaged when she's washing my hair with special treatments
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  #5  
Old 22-01-2017, 11:20 AM
Inika Inika is offline
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I used to do hairdressing and scalp massage was my specialty i'd have them sleeping by the time i was done. requesting me each time, requesting longer time spent on the conditioner massage as its slow and firm but not hurting. Especially them old ducks. they were always my favourite clients. it's what made me realize what i could do that really helps people internally. I give in a way that is how id like to receive, i place myself as the client. how would i like this? I dont put in only the capable and get me out of here , i want to do something else. people feel that energy in others, knowing they dont want to really be there. you pass that on and the experience begins to feel like a chore and not a customers wellbeing comes first. its a really horrible feeling.
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  #6  
Old 13-02-2017, 03:24 AM
NurtureInNature84 NurtureInNature84 is offline
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I have been a massage therapist for 7 years on the 17th. I leave it up to the client if they want to talk or not. Most of my clients are quiet and relaxing the whole time, which is fine. It is a relaxing job for me so i often prefer if they don't talk so I can focus on doing my job and not get distracted. I have a few who do nothing but talk, which is also great after getting to know them and whats going on in their life. It is up to you what is relaxing and what isn't. I also don't lead the conversation or make it about me. If they want to talk or have questions I will answer but usually keep it a bit short, the best thing to do is let it be up to the client. I have also had people say they want a therapist who doesn't talk. No big deal at all, next time you are doing the intake mention that you are very tired and just want to zone out. You are paying for a service and deserve to get what you need out of it :)
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  #7  
Old 13-02-2017, 04:24 AM
Silver Silver is offline
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It's perfectly acceptable for you to ask or comment before you start to have it be a 'peaceful' massage session. I've gone to a couple massage therapists and if I talk, they talk - sometimes I'm in the mood to chat with them and sometimes I just want to be quiet and enjoy.
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  #8  
Old 13-02-2017, 08:11 AM
Reikilady Reikilady is offline
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I'm a Reiki practitioner, so I don't say very much to my clients, after the initial 'introduction', they are paying me for a service, and it's their time. Same for me when I receive Reiki, I love just having that time for myself, to take myself off to wherever I want to go.
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  #9  
Old 06-08-2017, 07:30 AM
TinyToad TinyToad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticAngel
However, that does seem to be what we call a "rookie" mistake. Most (not all) new therapist seem to do that.

Often it is because they are nervous, the combination of being new to practicing on their own in a completely professional setting (as opposed to while in school) and with the experience being somewhat intimate (not sexually or even purely emotionally, but an intimacy in regards to the willing vulnerability of the client) with a complete stranger (new client). So again often there is a nervousness, and the newly professional massage therapist talks a lot in a conscious or subconscious effort to calm their nerves. An added layer to it, is that this nervousness can make it much more difficult for the new massage therapist to intuitively gauge how the client is experiencing the massage, and so forcing conversation is a means, either consciously or subconsciously, to get more direct signals from the client, by how the client sounds when they respond in conversation. Typically once the massage therapist grows in their confidence, the nervous chattering subsides, and most speaking is only responsive to the client. A nervous and thus chattering massage therapist can often be reassured and thus quieted if a client sends some casual but direct signals in the beginning that they are very laid back and appreciative of whatever the massage therapist can do, while requesting silence, such as something in a very relaxed and positive tone along the lines of (provided it is true, of course), "That feels awesome. I'm just going to close my eyes and be quiet for the rest, very relaxing."
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