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Go Back   Spiritual Forums > Lifestyle > Health

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  #51  
Old 23-01-2019, 11:57 PM
Gem Gem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inavalan
Let's just keep in mind that "scientists" are people too, and can be wrong. We tend to quote science when it confirms our beliefs. Faith in science is still faith ... :)




Personally, I'm critical because I come from an informed position (as opposed to an ideological one), but if was making generic recommendations, I'd go along with the Canadian Food guide.



The USA guidelines basically say the same thing as Canada, but their 'plate' doesn't have any food on it, and their dreary site isn't getting the message across. However, their recommendation concerning protein food is "A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), and nuts, seeds, and soy products" (exactly that on the Canadian 'plate').



The American Guide treats dairy very differently that Canada. It includes a glass of 'dairy' on the 'plate' which implies dairy is an essential food group unto itself. However, under their heading "A Healthy Eating Pattern Includes": "Fat-free or low-fat dairy, including milk, yogurt, cheese, and/or fortified soy beverages". They do include a calcium fortified vegan option - which is really very fair - but their message is 'dairy'.



Other than the seeming over importance of dairy, the USA guide basically says the same things as the Canadian guide, and I'd go with Canada on that point - because dairy shouldn't be considered essential and the Canadians are consistent with regard to saturated fat - (notwithstanding calcium is very important and dairy is a viable option).


The Canadian Food guide caused an uproar because of how it is presented more than anything else, and the only big change is the glaring omission omission of dairy on the plate (though we can't tell what the white stuff in the little bowl is). That aside, Canada's Guide is not remarkably different in content from the American Guide from 2011. The Americans might also treat dairy differently in their updated guide. We'll see.
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  #52  
Old 25-01-2019, 06:47 PM
linen53 linen53 is offline
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I haven't read this entire thread and for that I apologize. But I wanted to comment on the diet part.

Gem, Americans are spoiled and don't want to change their diet. It's as simple as that. With a fast food joint on every corner (2 burgers, an order of fries and a supersized soda for $5! is the latest ad I saw on tv today) they are happy to slowly kill themselves with diseases like Alzheimer's, cancers, fibromyalgia, MS, etc. I'm not saying all cases of disease are a result of poor diet and processed foods, but the statistics are alarming. Believe me, when I try to explain this to people I get the glazed look and no response....from many different people. I've learned for the most part to just shut up.

My issue is with the corn in the American diet. Manufacturers are literally putting it in everything.

Here's a very smart author who penned an excellent article explaining it.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/01/what-its-like-be-allergic-corn/580594/?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=p ockethits

As for the way I live. I don't 'should' on myself anymore. I'm here to learn and I can only do that by making mistakes. Nuff' said there.
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  #53  
Old 25-01-2019, 07:21 PM
JustBe JustBe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linen53
I haven't read this entire thread and for that I apologize. But I wanted to comment on the diet part.

Gem, Americans are spoiled and don't want to change their diet. It's as simple as that. With a fast food joint on every corner (2 burgers, an order of fries and a supersized soda for $5! is the latest ad I saw on tv today) they are happy to slowly kill themselves with diseases like Alzheimer's, cancers, fibromyalgia, MS, etc. I'm not saying all cases of disease are a result of poor diet and processed foods, but the statistics are alarming. Believe me, when I try to explain this to people I get the glazed look and no response....from many different people. I've learned for the most part to just shut up.

My issue is with the corn in the American diet. Manufacturers are literally putting it in everything.

Here's a very smart author who penned an excellent article explaining it.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/01/what-its-like-be-allergic-corn/580594/?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=p ockethits

As for the way I live. I don't 'should' on myself anymore. I'm here to learn and I can only do that by making mistakes. Nuff' said there.
.

Hi linen

I have quite a few American friends. Most eat balanced healthier foods sourced from farmers markets(home grown organic). These issues of corn in everything simply make those who want more and healthier foods seek it out differently. It is a huge issue, taking over the majority of the food industry, but it, opens those aware to support the food growers more directly. Plus it forces people like yourself to stop buying/eating processed foods because you care and are aware.
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  #54  
Old 25-01-2019, 11:46 PM
Gem Gem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linen53
I haven't read this entire thread and for that I apologize. But I wanted to comment on the diet part.

Gem, Americans are spoiled and don't want to change their diet. It's as simple as that. With a fast food joint on every corner (2 burgers, an order of fries and a supersized soda for $5! is the latest ad I saw on tv today) they are happy to slowly kill themselves with diseases like Alzheimer's, cancers, fibromyalgia, MS, etc. I'm not saying all cases of disease are a result of poor diet and processed foods, but the statistics are alarming. Believe me, when I try to explain this to people I get the glazed look and no response....from many different people. I've learned for the most part to just shut up.


The issues with the Standard American Diet aren't really simple, but because the 'freedom ideology' is based on 'it's your choice' it seems simple: People could just choose to eat something else. 'Your choice' is the mantra of the fitness industry as well, but the success rate is under 10%. What we are doing doesn't work because we are too narrow minded to see the entire scope of the issue. We don't look past the individual and their personal choices, when in actual fact, a person has personal (physical, mental, emotional and spiritual), social, cultural, political, ideological and historical dimensions.


For example: if there is an obese 10 year old boy, we don't say them, "It's your choice, mate. You are responsible", because the child is dependent on what parent choose for them. The parents are not 'independent' either, because adult people are dependent in ways on the larger society, and just like children are not responsible for their obesity insofar as they are dependent, adults are not responsible for their obesity insofar as they are dependent on society.


If it was true that 'it's your personal choice and responsibility' we would see random people becoming obese here and there, but in fact, we see statistical patterns in families, in communities, and as a society at large. Since we have these clear statistical trends, and not random scatterings of individual choices, we have to accept that ideology, socio-economic policy, social systems and the structural built environment are strong drivers of obesity rates.





The ideological statement 'you are free so it's your choice' is over-simplified because it overlooks the greater expanse of an individual's social life and environment - and as long as we continue the narrow 'personal choice' mentality, adverse obesity and fitness rates will continue to climb - and that is a neglect of an unimaginable scale of harm!


Quote:
My issue is with the corn in the American diet. Manufacturers are literally putting it in everything.

Here's a very smart author who penned an excellent article explaining it.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...n=p ockethits

As for the way I live. I don't 'should' on myself anymore. I'm here to learn and I can only do that by making mistakes. Nuff' said there.




That's good, because too much 'should' makes us ignore 'is', and we really have to be aware of 'what is' and start from 'here'. Then we are present with our actual life and can make measured, mindful decisions based on what is doable now.



Thanks for the article. I'll read that and come back with a comment, but for now I'll say, if there is corn everywhere, in everything, are people 'choosing' to eat corn? This is a good example of what I was saying above.
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  #55  
Old 26-01-2019, 03:43 PM
linen53 linen53 is offline
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Gem what do they feed cattle just before they slaughter them to fatten them up? Corn.

So our obesity (and btw I am obese due to genetics) is a direct result of being fed corn in everything in the grocery store. And no I don't eat corn. I can't. It would kill me.

JustBe, I have many American friends and all but a few of them have lousy diets. And the ones that eat well? They are forced to because of family members with food allergies/intolerance. Just like me.

They are experimenting with a celiac vaccine right now. Yes, when it come available and I can afford it, I will get it, not so I can eat lousy again; I will always remain on a gluten and corn free diet. But because it can cut down on cross-contamination exposure. Thus save what little I have left of my small intestine.
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If you hit rock bottom, start picking up rocks.

By embracing my imperfections I am becoming perfect.

Itís through the cracks that the light gets in.
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  #56  
Old 26-01-2019, 06:46 PM
Altair Altair is offline
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When I was in the U.S. I could totally understand why people live unhealthy..
If you compare U.S. with Europe.. (this is my general observation)...

Europe

- Smaller cities with old city centres where much is doable on foot
- Cycling is more common and this is reflected by infrastructure favouring cycling (some countries)
- Okay food is relatively cheap and readily available
- Europeans take pride in regional and national foods, less Fordist produced foods
- More leisure time and time to exercise

U.S.

- Larger spread cities and shopping centres that need to be visited with car
- Car culture is necessary because of how U.S. cities were built (open, spread areas, in contrast to old medieval style in Europe)
- Unhealthy food is cheap and readily available
- Healthy food can be very expensive
- Longer work days that reduce time to exercise


Of course you have varieties in Europe and the U.S. but these observations are more or less a norm. While people have a degree of responsibility it’s also true that the very way in which U.S. cities were made will lead to drastically different outcomes!
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  #57  
Old 26-01-2019, 11:00 PM
Gem Gem is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Altair
When I was in the U.S. I could totally understand why people live unhealthy..
If you compare U.S. with Europe.. (this is my general observation)...

Europe

- Smaller cities with old city centres where much is doable on foot
- Cycling is more common and this is reflected by infrastructure favouring cycling (some countries)
- Okay food is relatively cheap and readily available
- Europeans take pride in regional and national foods, less Fordist produced foods
- More leisure time and time to exercise

U.S.

- Larger spread cities and shopping centres that need to be visited with car
- Car culture is necessary because of how U.S. cities were built (open, spread areas, in contrast to old medieval style in Europe)
- Unhealthy food is cheap and readily available
- Healthy food can be very expensive
- Longer work days that reduce time to exercise


Of course you have varieties in Europe and the U.S. but these observations are more or less a norm. While people have a degree of responsibility it’s also true that the very way in which U.S. cities were made will lead to drastically different outcomes!




Yea, what you posted is mainly about the structural built environment and cultural practice/national lifestyle (which affects both diet and activity); and some about the affordability of food - which together has a significant impact on obesity rates. It's pretty cool how what you said packed all those impacts into 5 short points.


The basic point is, no man is an island and choices are not made in a vacuum. The 'obesity equation' is far bigger than any individual. The individual level of the 'equation' is only a small part a big picture, but if individuals understand that there is a big picture rather than believing it's 'all on them', that would empower them to better navigate their food environment.
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