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  #21  
Old 15-01-2019, 01:42 PM
Still_Waters Still_Waters is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sky123
'I simply started listening and let the information come to me '

Then it becomes a Happening rather than a Doing.... That is how I also Meditate 99% of the time as it works for me

My teacher once said to me, "You're an experienced meditator. Meditate and all will be revealed". As you duly noted, "it becomes a happening rather than a doing".....and the happening can either take place during meditation or in pursuing apparently outward worldly pursuits.
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  #22  
Old 15-01-2019, 01:45 PM
hallow hallow is offline
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Originally Posted by Still_Waters
My teacher once said to me, "You're an experienced meditator. Meditate and all will be revealed". As you duly noted, "it becomes a happening rather than a doing".....and the happening can either take place during meditation or in pursuing apparently outward worldly pursuits.
how do you meditate? What works for you?
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  #23  
Old 15-01-2019, 08:29 PM
iamthat iamthat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Still_Waters
Ironically, once my meditation patterns changed, I came across a Ramana Maharshi statement quoted by David Godman. "Sitting in meditation for extended periods at precise times is for the merest of spiritual novices." Years before, that statement would have shocked me but, when I heard it, I immediately understood.

An interesting quote. In his younger days Ramana Maharshi spent many years in meditation. And back in my twenties I would often sit in meditation for several days at a time. But then the responsibilities of life took over and I seldom sat for more than an hour. Perhaps my lessons in life lay elsewhere, although my meditation has continued over the years. But now, as a retired fellow approaching 60 I feel drawn to immersing myself back in meditation and once more embracing the Yogi within me.

Peace.
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  #24  
Old 16-01-2019, 11:52 AM
Still_Waters Still_Waters is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hallow
how do you meditate? What works for you?

First of all, it's important to define meditation. The best definition that I've found thus far is one that I stole from Nisargadatta Maharaj: "Meditation is the art of shifting attention to subtler and subtler levels of consciousness without losing a grip on those levels left behind". Therefore, one eventually evolves into various here-and-now types of meditation which does not preclude sitting but which becomes more real-time (so to speak).

I will elaborate on this further, but I will give you an example now.

I used to have a somewhat wild Sicilian temper. At night, I would meditate on related incidents, their cause, my reactions, etc. Eventually, I realized that I didn't have all the details and I resolved to watch the "incidents" during the process of unfolding. I could easily identify triggers and would then start to observe the incident as it unfolded. The pulse would go faster. The jaw would tense. I could observe the mental and emotional and physical components of the process in the moment but initially couldn't stop it. Eventually, however, through the detachment of direct observation and acute understanding, I was able to simply recognize the emotion and, instead of getting angry or letting anger drive my reaction, simply decide how best to proceed. My sitting meditations therefore prompted interactive real-time meditations and I discovered that I could shift attention to different levels of consciousness while walking, bicycle riding, sitting, and even sleeping as I gravitated towards "conscious sleep meditations" whereby I could watch the three states (deep sleep, dream formation and dissolution, and the so-called waking state) as well as the transitions between the various states.

These types of meditations led to subtler and subtler revelations as medication became a continuous process as opposed to sitting at prescribed intervals at specific periods ---- a process that Ramana Maharshi said was "for the merest of spiritual novices".
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  #25  
Old 16-01-2019, 12:05 PM
Still_Waters Still_Waters is offline
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Originally Posted by iamthat
An interesting quote. In his younger days Ramana Maharshi spent many years in meditation. And back in my twenties I would often sit in meditation for several days at a time. But then the responsibilities of life took over and I seldom sat for more than an hour. Perhaps my lessons in life lay elsewhere, although my meditation has continued over the years. But now, as a retired fellow approaching 60 I feel drawn to immersing myself back in meditation and once more embracing the Yogi within me.

Peace.

You are absolutely correct about Ramana Maharshi spending many years in meditation. He was considered to be a "Mouni Sadhu" (Silent Monk) and it's not clear exactly what type of meditation he did as he did not speak. However, it is clear that he did NOT read scriptures once he left his home (he said that himself) and his form of meditation seems clear by the instructions that he gave to others.

Like yourself, I used to sit for up to 8-9 hours on weekend when I had the time and wasn't working. It was not a forced meditation to sit as long as I could. Rather, it was an "absorbed meditation" in the sense that I was contemplating something that my teacher had said or something that had happened or something that I had read which really resonated. Even I was surprised at the length of the meditations as I initially thought there was a problem with my clock when I came out of a "short meditation" only to realize that 8-9 hours had elapsed.

Now, as I mentioned in my previous post, I rarely do sitting meditations at prescribed times for prescribed intervals. Ramana's statement shook me a bit initially because of my previous meditation background (sitting) which we share. However, upon reflection, it made perfect sense that sitting for prescribed intervals at specific times is indeed for the "merest of spiritual novices" despite what the Zen masters and zazen practitioners may say. Without judging, one must choose the meditation technique best suited to one's development .... until one no longer needs it.
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  #26  
Old 16-01-2019, 01:23 PM
hallow hallow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Still_Waters
First of all, it's important to define meditation. The best definition that I've found thus far is one that I stole from Nisargadatta Maharaj: "Meditation is the art of shifting attention to subtler and subtler levels of consciousness without losing a grip on those levels left behind". Therefore, one eventually evolves into various here-and-now types of meditation which does not preclude sitting but which becomes more real-time (so to speak).

I will elaborate on this further, but I will give you an example now.

I used to have a somewhat wild Sicilian temper. At night, I would meditate on related incidents, their cause, my reactions, etc. Eventually, I realized that I didn't have all the details and I resolved to watch the "incidents" during the process of unfolding. I could easily identify triggers and would then start to observe the incident as it unfolded. The pulse would go faster. The jaw would tense. I could observe the mental and emotional and physical components of the process in the moment but initially couldn't stop it. Eventually, however, through the detachment of direct observation and acute understanding, I was able to simply recognize the emotion and, instead of getting angry or letting anger drive my reaction, simply decide how best to proceed. My sitting meditations therefore prompted interactive real-time meditations and I discovered that I could shift attention to different levels of consciousness while walking, bicycle riding, sitting, and even sleeping as I gravitated towards "conscious sleep meditations" whereby I could watch the three states (deep sleep, dream formation and dissolution, and the so-called waking state) as well as the transitions between the various states.

These types of meditations led to subtler and subtler revelations as medication became a continuous process as opposed to sitting at prescribed intervals at specific periods ---- a process that Ramana Maharshi said was "for the merest of spiritual novices".
thank you for your response! that was the best description of meditation. Certain types of music, do that for me. (Flow thought the layers). Pink Floyd, in particular. They have a strangly powerful album called "Piper at the gates of dawn". I learned not to play that in vehicle. The one time I did I completely lost track of everything. And didn't remember how I got to where I was when I "woke up". Not good when you're driving.
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  #27  
Old 17-01-2019, 11:30 AM
Still_Waters Still_Waters is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hallow
thank you for your response! that was the best description of meditation. Certain types of music, do that for me. (Flow thought the layers). Pink Floyd, in particular. They have a strangly powerful album called "Piper at the gates of dawn". I learned not to play that in vehicle. The one time I did I completely lost track of everything. And didn't remember how I got to where I was when I "woke up". Not good when you're driving.

Particular types of music can indeed induce a calm, relaxed state conducive to meditation.

Thanks for your kind words.
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