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AstralProjectee
06-07-2012, 01:55 PM
In Taoism and Hinduism chi seems to be a big player in their texts but I don't find that very much in Buddhism.

They say the word for chi in Buddhism is Lüng. Maybe it's talked about, but other religions seem to put more emphasis on the light force.

Am I missing something?

Thanks.

Peace and light!

Rin
06-07-2012, 02:58 PM
Buddhism arose from a dissatisfaction with Hinduism where chi/ki does not play a major part. Yoga has a long tradition of breathing which is connected with prana but its manipulation does not seem to the major focus.
The practical and deliberate use of chi seems to be connected with the martial arts, shaolin monks and Samurai warriors.
Chi/ki is therefore a late comer to Buddhism.

Off the cuff and not having done any research I may be wrong in all of this.

AstralProjectee
06-07-2012, 03:04 PM
When I think of Hinduism and kundalini I think of shaktipat initiation which is unheard of in Buddhism I believe. Taoism does the same thing too.

Peace and light!

Xan
06-07-2012, 04:33 PM
AP... If you'll look into Tibetan Buddhism you'll find more energy practices than in other branches.


Xan

AstralProjectee
07-07-2012, 05:47 AM
AP... If you'll look into Tibetan Buddhism you'll find more energy practices than in other branches.


XanNo other religion has more energy/chi practices than Taoism IMHO. The secret sects of Taoism are so secret nobody can find out how to do their practices. The Taoists spiritual technology is so advanced, they can do things that would make other religions drool over their abilities.


Mo Pai Nei Kung is the one of the Taoist traditions I am talking about.


Peace and light!

AstralProjectee
07-07-2012, 08:00 AM
When I think of Buddhism I think of samatha and vipassana.

I know enlightened buddhist master Tarthang Tulku was big on feeling and energy. Never heard him talk about transferring chi energy.

Peace and light!

Xan
07-07-2012, 06:09 PM
No other religion has more energy/chi practices than Taoism IMHO. The secret sects of Taoism are so secret nobody can find out how to do their practices. The Taoists spiritual technology is so advanced, they can do things that would make other religions drool over their abilities.

Mo Pai Nei Kung is the one of the Taoist traditions I am talking about.

Yes, though you were asking about energy practices in Buddhism. For that I suggest Tibetan teachings.

Bruce Kumar Frantzis is a Taoist alchemy teacher deeply trained in the ancient traditions, who has brought out many of the former secrets for Westerner students. He has written several excellent books.


Xan

AstralProjectee
08-07-2012, 03:57 AM
Bruce Kumar Frantzis is a Taoist alchemy teacher deeply trained in the ancient traditions, who has brought out many of the former secrets for Westerner students. He has written several excellent books. I have read some of Bruce's books. It just adds to the comprehension of spirituality.

Peace and light!

Xan
08-07-2012, 05:05 AM
It's Frantzis' Taoist alchemy exercises that I felt gave me the most benefit.


Xan

AstralProjectee
08-07-2012, 09:48 AM
Frantzis' is into the water method which is good but I would think a mixture of water and fire would be good too or even better.

Peace and light!

Mayflow
08-07-2012, 01:58 PM
Have you read Thomas Cleary's translation of the Secret of the Golden Flower? I would think you would like it a lot. http://www.harpercollins.com/browseinside/index.aspx?isbn13=9780062501936

Xan
08-07-2012, 02:42 PM
Developing one method thoroughly and deeply before spreading out is more effective in the long run, AP. This is what takes us beyond understanding the concepts into the awakening and transformation at a higher level.


Xan

BodhiChan
08-07-2012, 11:48 PM
In Taoism and Hinduism chi seems to be a big player in their texts but I don't find that very much in Buddhism.
They say the word for chi in Buddhism is Lüng. Maybe it's talked about, but other religions seem to put more emphasis on the light force.

Am I missing something?

Thanks.

Peace and light!

You are correct. Personally, IMHO it is because Chi/Kundalini is largely connected/associated to (I purposely avoided the word "attached")SEX (oh no the dreaded "S" word...)

Namaste,

Bodhi

ThoughtOnFire
10-07-2012, 11:38 PM
I Believe The Science and Art of Kundalini is in fact the "Religion" of the Mystery Schools and Orders of The Ancient World. I'm talking back to 10,500 BC and Beyond, (further back), Here. From Ancient Egypt, "Khem", to the Ancient Americas. From the Gnostic Teachings to Taoism to Hinduism to Anywhere You Look. Of course this is a big statement, and depends heavily on Alternative History and Controversial Archeology.

Mayflow
11-07-2012, 12:04 AM
Developing one method thoroughly and deeply before spreading out is more effective in the long run, AP. This is what takes us beyond understanding the concepts into the awakening and transformation at a higher level.


Xan


From my thought processes, this is to experiment and explore how a certain method or belief system or whatever works for you very thoroughly and deeply, but not hold to them as the only ones and instead as a basis to explore more?

CSEe
11-07-2012, 01:50 AM
In Taoism and Hinduism chi seems to be a big player in their texts but I don't find that very much in Buddhism.

They say the word for chi in Buddhism is Lüng. Maybe it's talked about, but other religions seem to put more emphasis on the light force.

Am I missing something?

Thanks.

Peace and light!

Buddhism is all about realizing own self ...is beyond knowledge . It is not a "information counter" but a liberation from life .
Thks
CSEe

Tanemon
11-07-2012, 05:32 PM
Just a few scattered thoughts on the original question in the O.P.

The Tibetan-Buddhist teachings and practice of tummo are directly related to activating and managing kundalini.

The Ch'an (Zen) scholar D.T. Suzuki often expressed that the Ch'an (Japanese: Zen, Korean: Sohn) sect has been a development in Buddhism that embraced Indian-Buddhist metaphysics and general philosophy, but absorbed a great deal of Taoism into itself. As a young man, Suzuki lived in a Japanese Rinzai-Zen monastery, and his book about what the life is all about (The Training of a Zen Buddhist Monk) mentions how the infirmary in a Zen monastery used the Chinese moxa system of treating points on the meridians.

The American Zen Buddhist teacher Philip Kapleau explained at the end of his classic training-companion, The Three Pillars of Zen, that progress in Zen-Buddhist training and enlightenment is a matter of Kundalini activating the various chakras along the spine and into the brain.

Informally, some of the Japanese teachers connected with the Tassajara training center and the San Francisco Zen Center (both in California) have spoken about chi (Japanese pronunciation: ki).

So it's not that kundalini and chi aren't in the concepts of Buddhist traditions, but that the focus for training is with certain simple practicalities - certain practices.