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View Full Version : Why is this author bad to follow?


johnatre
13-09-2011, 11:32 PM
I have only one wicca book and its the ultimate book of shadows by raven silverwolf, but everyone says she is very bad to read but most of what ive read in this book seems pretty legit? Help?

Terracotta
13-09-2011, 11:46 PM
If her writing rings true with you, then make your own judgments about her work and her guidance. If I recall my old days among Paganism and Wicca correctly, she's sometimes looked down on because she's believed to be far too fluffy - that is, too childish, far-fetched, or cutesy to be accurate or useful.

EbonyDoe
14-09-2011, 12:40 AM
I'll probablly catch heat for this, but personally I like Ravenwolf's works. Now this could be because she was one of the first authors I read when I started, but I do like them (have 3 of her books).

Animus27
14-09-2011, 01:08 AM
I have only one wicca book and its the ultimate book of shadows by raven silverwolf, but everyone says she is very bad to read but most of what ive read in this book seems pretty legit? Help?
She's generally looked at with disdain by serious pagans and Wiccans because she encourages teenagers to lie to their parents, she's rather hateful when it comes to Christianity (and makes it out like any witch should share her feelings), and she tends to make things up, or exaggerate greatly.

She's just not the best author to begin with; because it's hard to start out in a religion to begin with - and even harder when you get misinformation about it all, because you'll simply have to revisit your knowledge when you learn better. There's many other beginner-friendly authors that are much more praised for the most part - but one must keep in mind that there's a lot of shoddy "101" books (my personal theory is that they're called 101 books because they usually cost about a $1.01 and you get what you pay for :tongue:), always use critical thinking and fact checking when you read any book, sadly, especially with Wiccan/neo-pagan mass-market books.

norseman
14-09-2011, 08:00 AM
My top choice is ALWAYS going to be Hutton or Wilby, respected academics with books that are peer reviewed. Just a side-thought - if you wanted a book on American culture, would you go with an American writer or someone from another country ? If you want a book on wicca, go back to the source ! You need to be very selective. There is so much garbage written about wicca/witchcraft by people with dubious names/titles.
And, of course, there is so much that is not written and never will be. There are paths which can only be gained by experience and being immersed in them.

mattie
14-09-2011, 08:30 AM
It is often useful to read various authors on any subject to get an overview that is more than a single author can provide.

norseman
14-09-2011, 11:14 AM
It is often useful to read various authors on any subject to get an overview that is more than a single author can provide.
True ! - providing you check, check, and double-check the background and credentials of the author first.

To those starting out, look in here as a stepping-off point
http://www.sacred-texts.com/bos/index.htm (http://www.spiritualforums.com/vb/redir.php?link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sacred-texts.com%2Fbos%2Findex.htm)

psychoslice
14-09-2011, 12:06 PM
Yes use your own mind, never follow anyone, read what they have to say, take only what you want to use as your tools, then come to your own conclusions, if you don't you will always be a second-hand product.

Lostgirl
14-09-2011, 12:33 PM
I agree use your own mind and make your own descisions - if you like her and what she says speaks to you then go with it if not then find something else. I personally found her fluffy and patronising but im not wiccan which might be why :)

mattie
14-09-2011, 12:52 PM
True ! - providing you check, check, and double-check the background and credentials of the author first.
...

We should always use our discernment (http://www.spiritualforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=12105)even when the author has the requisite background & creds. Even the best authors who are 99% Spot On can be off base about that pesky 1%!!

Medium_Laura
14-09-2011, 01:16 PM
I agree to make up your own mind. I actually gave my children "Teen Witch" though I didn't read it. It is my great hope that my children understand that lying leads to mis-trust, which is something I've stressed a lot in raising them. They can tell me anything and I will keep my cool, but finding out they lied to me, I cannot condone. Both of my children are self proclaimed witches, though one is on the fence and wants to be a Christian Witch (I find that sooo cute!) I let them make their own paths and their own choices.

Scott Cunningham is also a great author when it comes to beginning Wicca.

Enjoy the journey

(Witch for over 25 years)

norseman
14-09-2011, 03:09 PM
True again ! Actually I would accept 90% spot on. This is not exactly an objective subject area. :D

Summerlander
14-09-2011, 03:18 PM
Are there any books about Summerland?

Taurus/Gemini
16-09-2011, 06:15 AM
yup the best part of wicca is you can take what works for you and use it and not use what dont. A little of this and a lot of that. Till you get what fits you perfectly. Follow what feels right and harm none and you will be great. Blessed Be!

Finnster
16-09-2011, 11:52 AM
I started out with Silver Ravenwolf but then slowl gravitated toward Scott Cunningham. Silver's work is full of good poetry and exercises to start you off down the path but I agree that her attitude toward Christianity and openness with parents is not exactly a good thing. She is also fairly materialistic when it comes to ritual. What I found silly was that she always said you can go and buy things for ritual. I however like to go into my backyard for things needed.

Anyway, use your own judgment. If she rings true then stay with her until you learn what you need from her and move on to another author.

Sungirl
16-09-2011, 01:06 PM
I read one of her books and I felt it was too fluffy.

My opinion is this (and it is just my opinion)... if the author has an "etherial name" bin it... Give me Marion Green any day. The closest I get to is Glennie Kindred.. I rate her books very highly but then her name isn't that odd.. like Rae Beth. "Titania" is just rediculous... It's all about image.. may as well be Mystic Meg!!

If the book is full of spells and lacking in spirituality, walk away. To me paganism (yes I know this thread is about wicca) is about a connection to spirituality first and about spells and rituals last.

Every writer is welcome to their opinion but for me the combinations of a fancy name, shiny cover and lots of spells screams "fluffy teen witch" stuff and is not the basis of a spirituality that will help with self developement and growth.

norseman
16-09-2011, 03:59 PM
"if the author has an "etherial name" bin it"
My thought exactly, Tilia ! Also those who claim to be High Priestess of this and that - bin them too !

"yes I know this thread is about wicca"
I have had my grumbles about that :D . Much broader I think.

John32241
18-09-2011, 03:28 PM
I agree to make up your own mind. I actually gave my children "Teen Witch" though I didn't read it. It is my great hope that my children understand that lying leads to mis-trust, which is something I've stressed a lot in raising them. They can tell me anything and I will keep my cool, but finding out they lied to me, I cannot condone. Both of my children are self proclaimed witches, though one is on the fence and wants to be a Christian Witch (I find that sooo cute!) I let them make their own paths and their own choices.

Scott Cunningham is also a great author when it comes to beginning Wicca.

Enjoy the journey

(Witch for over 25 years)
I like that "Christian Witch" perspective.

Once you recognize that Christian religions tend to suppress the teachings of Jesus, you can appreciate the energy behind that particular interest.

If I may, I would like to suggest these two "Anna" books as reading material for this child.
http://www.lightrivermedia.com/ (http://www.spiritualforums.com/vb/redir.php?link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lightrivermedia.co m%2F)

That $30 expenditure will support the appreciation for the teachings of Jesus, which I tend to see as humanity's greatest teacher of quantum physics.

In my view, we all have a lot to learn about a great many things. I see these works as foundational for a true Christian Witch.

John

norseman
19-09-2011, 08:46 AM
I would just like to point out that Witchcraft is a religion in it's own right. The original religion of the British Isles and pre-christian by a long way. Christian Witch is an oxymoron ! Where people get confused is in the craft aspect. Witchcraft should actually be written Witch Craft i.e. the Craft of the Witch - the working tools if you wish. However, much of the Craft involves invoking deities or nature spirits which brings me back to my original statement. The only time that Witchcraft and Christianity came close was in the Ancient Celtic Church, especially after they had absorbed the Druids. Don't forget that it was the Celtic Church that brought christianity to Britain from their centre of Holy Isle [ Lindisfarne ]. They were forced out of there when the Norse incursions began and finally lost out to the RC church at the Synod of Whitby. They then submerged into obscurity. Over a thousand years later, a new connection was made when Gerald Gardner founded Wicca. Gardner was an ordained priest of the Celtic Church, as was his good friend Ross Nichol who revitalised the largest order of British Druidry. The Wheel turns and old Cycles are reborn. It was recently announced that the Celtic Church was re-establishing itself on Holy Isle.

Lostgirl
19-09-2011, 09:26 AM
Im so glad you brought this up Norseman! I was a bit baffled when a Christian Witch was mentioned.

John32241
19-09-2011, 10:31 AM
The Anna books describe how Jesus was a Druid priest. He studied many things from different regions of the known world.

I find it amazing that a 10 year old child has the inner wisdom to know these things and the more educated do not. The established Christian church did everything it could to direct its followers away from the healing energy work promoted by Jesus and his family. I suspect that this was done because Jesus honored the ways of women.

Since our documented history has always been written by the winners of, shall we say, diverse points of view, there is frequently only 1 history book. Those Anna books attempt to shed some light on those contrasting Christian teachings.

I am fond of those who seek self empowerment in any form. I encourage it. However in that process, we frequently need to adjust our perceptions and trust our inner guidance. That is why I am so impressed with this wise young one.

Amazing!!
John

norseman
19-09-2011, 11:32 AM
Hi John ! I turned up a reference by D. A. Mackenzie in his work "Buddhism in Pre-Christian Britain" which maintains that an Indian King, Ashok, sent Buddhist Missionaries to learn "the mysteries of the Far North from the Cimmorians [?]" but they got lost and ended up in Wales and were taught the Celtic Mysteries by the Welsh Cunning Folk. So, the original Druids were not racially Celtic if this is true.
Incidently, there is another link in this regarding the early settlers of Ireland. They also travelled to the "Far North" to be taught "wizardry and druidry" before returning to Ireland as the Tuatha de Danaan.

John32241
19-09-2011, 11:50 AM
Hi John ! I turned up a reference by D. A. Mackenzie in his work "Buddhism in Pre-Christian Britain" which maintains that an Indian King, Ashok, sent Buddhist Missionaries to learn "the mysteries of the Far North from the Cimmorians [?]" but they got lost and ended up in Wales and were taught the Celtic Mysteries by the Welsh Cunning Folk. So, the original Druids were not racially Celtic if this is true.
Incidently, there is another link in this regarding the early settlers of Ireland. They also travelled to the "Far North" to be taught "wizardry and druidry" before returning to Ireland as the Tuatha de Danaan.

Hi,

We can learn a lot from history if we take the time to evaluate it.

I have started to look at the Wicca section because I am interested in learning more about these teachings. I am not fond of the word religion because it implies dogma and not open minded thinking. Most of us need to cling to a "structure of though" by following its prescribed rituals. I am interested in appreciating all forms of benevolent energy work.

Having said that, may I ask if there is a book which you could recommend for me so that I could read information which would assist me in understanding the pagan ways?

Thanks,
John

Animus27
19-09-2011, 12:15 PM
I would just like to point out that Witchcraft is a religion in it's own right. The original religion of the British Isles and pre-christian by a long way. Christian Witch is an oxymoron ! Where people get confused is in the craft aspect. Witchcraft should actually be written Witch Craft i.e. the Craft of the Witch - the working tools if you wish. However, much of the Craft involves invoking deities or nature spirits which brings me back to my original statement.
Witchcraft is a irreligious activity. It's not necessarily connected to any deities or spirits. Technically one can be an atheist witch (even though that tends to raise some eyebrows).

Many traditions associated with witchcraft and magical acts tend be entwined with low mythology and folkloric remnants of pre-Christian religion - such as the huldrafolk in Iceland, which are obviously a leftover from Christianization but, are at the same time something different; but once the mythos and religious traditions are broken or fragmented to such a degree that they are no longer a threat to the new religion, then it's no longer a religion in a usual definition (which is rather vague, I'll admit, because religion is a tricky term), instead it's a flavored form of the new one with it's own traditions that resemble pagan religious activity, but have lost the underlying meaning in terms of why they are done for the most part.

Animus27
19-09-2011, 12:26 PM
Hi John ! I turned up a reference by D. A. Mackenzie in his work "Buddhism in Pre-Christian Britain" which maintains that an Indian King, Ashok, sent Buddhist Missionaries to learn "the mysteries of the Far North from the Cimmorians [?]" but they got lost and ended up in Wales and were taught the Celtic Mysteries by the Welsh Cunning Folk. So, the original Druids were not racially Celtic if this is true.
Incidently, there is another link in this regarding the early settlers of Ireland. They also travelled to the "Far North" to be taught "wizardry and druidry" before returning to Ireland as the Tuatha de Danaan.
That sounds really, really creative. :tongue:

The La Tene culture (which is generally accepted as the culture[s] that gave birth to the Celts) pre-date Buddhism, which means that such an institution as the druids, which were closely entwined within many Celtic cultures, would be extremely unlikely to have been a foreign priesthood. Not to mention the fact that... I think it was Julius Caesar who mentioned that the Gauls send their druids to Britan for education.

It took until the 2nd and 1st century BCE for Buddhism to make a stable appearance in the Bactrian kingdoms, where it took up root and created it's own forms of art, but even then never achieved much influence in the more western parts of the Greek speaking lands, to my knowledge.

I think it's an interesting proposition, but one that's really unlikely to have actually occurred; at least until the appearance of some lost Roman commentaries on how the druids spoke Sanskrit lol; or better yet, a Celtic altar dedicated to a Bodhisattva.

norseman
19-09-2011, 01:11 PM
"Witchcraft is a irreligious activity."

I suppose it depends on how you define religion. There is ample evidence of worship of The Great Mother all over Europe at the time of the last Ice Age, and even figurines of this potent fertility symbol being dredged off the floor of the North Sea which flooded around 5/6000 BC. In Britain there were Death Cults in the meso and neo-lithic [underground tombs and the like] so realms were recognised. Shaman would invoke Nature Spirits [ the Green Spirits of the Forest, etc]. Twenty miles from me is a henge dated about 4000 BC [Thornborough] which was a centre of spiritual activity in the Neolithic and in the time of the Celts - still used today. "Worship" of trees, springs, rock formations, other generally natural features in the landscape.
Maybe not formal religions but certainly articles of faith of some sort.

norseman
19-09-2011, 01:17 PM
John, a serious book for a serious man ! :smile:

The Triumph of the Moon - Prof. Ronald Hutton, University of Bristol

I am also very partial to

Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits - Emma Wilby, Fellow, University of Exeter

These are both academic books. :smile: