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UnderTheStars
25-08-2011, 02:16 AM
Hi, I'm 14 years old and a few months ago I became interested in Wicca. My family have been very devoted Catholics and if they saw I was studying Wicca they would take everything away from me and I would never be able to try and educate myself on the beautiful faith.
I really love the little information I have about the religion and if anyone could help me learn more then I would be very grateful. I can't join a coven because I can't drive and there would be no way for me to be a member. I feel like I should know more about sabbats and how to cast a circle but I need help. Thank you.

Lostgirl
25-08-2011, 08:41 AM
My best advice would be to get some books...if you can :S Scott Cunningham is great - two books of his would be Guide for a Solitary (or something along those lines) and then the follow on book to that Living Wicca :) He is very good and really easy to read i found. I also just got another book called A Witch Alone by Marian Green and althoughi have only just started it its great :) Ronald Hutton is good but more academic and its not an easy read.

You need to read as much as you can. Dont practice anything until you feel ready but the best bet is to join forums such as this but do all the reading you can. Dont take just one authors opinions and values draw what you agree with and disregard what you think is silly. Alot of it is about feeling your own way through and making your own path. We are all here to help so ask if you have any questions.

Also dont worry about your parents. You dont have to tell them anything if you dont want too. If you have someone safe to keep your books and candles and whatever else you have them put them there and theres no need for anyone to know unless they need to :)

UnderTheStars
25-08-2011, 12:30 PM
Thank you :)

mattie
25-08-2011, 01:14 PM
It is your right to keep your views about spirituality private, even from your parents. There is no need to cause them distress about this.

There are probably many sites that discuss these issues as well as the Wicca section of this site. Explore past posts in this section as they may well have information that would be useful for you.

It might be prudent to clear the computer history when you’ve visited any sites that could be problematic for you w/ your parents.

Medium_Laura
25-08-2011, 01:46 PM
If you don't want your parents to know, do it online. There are tons of posts here as Mattie says. If you really want books, try Silver Ravenwolf. She's easy to understand. To Ride a Magick Broomstick and to Stir a Magick Cauldron are two I recommend to teens. She also has one called Teen Witch that my daughter and son have both read.

norseman
25-08-2011, 02:48 PM
I have PM'd a route which is very uncontraversial and would be acceptable in most religions i.e. via the study of Nature.
Books - there is so much choice and so much drivel. The best book has been mentioned, Hutton, but it is expensive and needs a degree of thought.
Dont take this the wrong way but any coven which accepts you at 14, you should run a mile from. Just be very careful, there are many phonies around.

You can get a good overview here http://www.sacred-texts.com/

Tanith
25-08-2011, 04:04 PM
In my opinion, one of the most basic, and possibly best ways to learn about the different seasons and when to celebrate the sabbats would be to purchase a farmer's almanac. The almanac is based on the Wheel of the Year because planting seasons, harvest seasons, and all other such times of the year that farmers use follow the same sabbats as Wiccans do, though obviously for different reasons.

Though it will obviously not delve into the spiritual aspect of Wicca, it will help you keep track of the change in the seasons, sunrise and setting times (if you wish to observe one or the other for spiritual reasons) and other handy things. The almanac will also be slightly easier to explain if the parents happen to find it. Some almanacs may even have a bit of historical information about each solstice/equinox, and again, though lacking in the spiritual department, would be a fair place to start perhaps..

My family is devout southern baptist. Anyone from the Southern US knows this is an incredibly close-minded sect. However, my grandmother uses and has used the almanac for years, as has our family, to coincide planting and harvesting seasons.

It may not work out, but it is a place to start perhaps.

Tanith
25-08-2011, 04:06 PM
Dont take this the wrong way but any coven which accepts you at 14, you should run a mile from. Just be very careful, there are many phonies around.

I agree with Norseman. Be careful- a good coven/church/etc will probably not allow you to join without parental consent. If they do... I just think that would not be a good situation for anyone, no matter WHAT the religion is.

UnderTheStars
25-08-2011, 04:50 PM
I didn't even think about that :l

Lostgirl
25-08-2011, 06:17 PM
Yea i agree with Norseman, i would run a mile :) These days it so common for people to be solitary that there is so much help out there :)

LadyMoondancer
26-08-2011, 02:46 PM
Welcome UndertheStars to Wicca

Your questions are very valid, and the others here have all given you great advice.
I would never have thought of the Farmers Almanac to recomend to someone in your position and that is a great idea! Also the idea of studying nature. Plants and herbs. You might even begin teaching yourself all about herbal teas and essential oils/flower remedies in the health food stores. One of the studies of Wicca is herbs and their medicinal (and magickal) uses.

Another study in Wicca is Astrology, for diviniation. If your parents object to Astrology, you can always get a book on basic astronomy and begin to learn about the Cosmos and the constellations.

Some Wiccans believe that it was Goddess, not "God" who created the universe, via the Big Bang.

There is so much to learn in Wicca, and so many ways to learn it without your parents finding out. But always be respectful of them. They have chosen their path to Divinity, just as you are finding your path. It is unfortuante that at this point you can't be open with them, and bear in mind, you may NEVER be able to be open with them. I am 59. My father died this past January at age 88. I have been officially Wiccan for 10 years, but have NOT been Catholic since the same age as you - 14. And I never told my father - he just wouldn't have understood.

LadyMoondancer
26-08-2011, 03:01 PM
oh - I just thought of something - mattie suggested clearing the history of the computer after you're done using it. But there might be some sites that you would like to go back to.

I suggest saving the url addresses of all the interesting sites on a folder on a separate flashdrive. - in fact, if you start saving information on it, this could be the beginning of your Book of Shadows.

Animus27
26-08-2011, 03:24 PM
Hi, I'm 14 years old and a few months ago I became interested in Wicca. My family have been very devoted Catholics and if they saw I was studying Wicca they would take everything away from me and I would never be able to try and educate myself on the beautiful faith.
I really love the little information I have about the religion and if anyone could help me learn more then I would be very grateful. I can't join a coven because I can't drive and there would be no way for me to be a member. I feel like I should know more about sabbats and how to cast a circle but I need help. Thank you.
I second what Norseman said: any coven that accepts a minor is full of bad news bears.

And as others have mentioned, there's a lot of resources online you can find, Wicca has the big benefit that there's a lot of writing on the subject - but that's also it's biggest problem; you have to use a lot of critical thinking and cross reference to separate the chaff from the wheat.

And if you do happen to go book shopping - stay away from Raven Silverwolf. Her books are extremely questionable and would just be a waste of money. I've also heard that Ann Moura is a little unreliable as well.

Just remember to not take any author's word as universal truth.

Here's a website with a lot of good solid information and tips from a general paganish/witchcraft perspective with a bit about Wicca you can cut your teeth on: http://gleewood.org/seeking/

Hope that helps a little bit.

norseman
26-08-2011, 04:37 PM
"stay away from Raven Silverwolf." :D I was trying to say that without saying that. I still say Hutton !

norseman
26-08-2011, 04:43 PM
"The almanac is based on the Wheel of the Year because planting seasons, harvest seasons, and all other such times of the year that farmers use follow the same sabbats as Wiccans do, though obviously for different reasons."

Actually, Tanith, it was the other way round. The Wheel of the Year was organised by Gerald Gardner and Ross Nichol [founder of the largest order of British Druids], based on the Farmer's Almanac.

Hazel
26-08-2011, 06:46 PM
There a many books around on the subject - you just have to look for them. Also im the same age as you basically im a week and 5 days from being 15. Anywqay as everyone is saying you can ask people here, read books, search online. And as with your parents would they still take everything from you if you tell them it's a hobby so they may think it will pass then when your 18 properly devote yourself. Also like Norseman said i dont think many proper covens would accept you at 14 becuase you couldnt firmly say you'd get to the meetings and you cant really get the resources and things at 14 - i have been wicca for a year now and im still learning along with finding resources still.

I still dont have resources for casting a circle and i only just got my mum - a non strict christian to agree to buy me my first non expensive wand today. Take your time and let yourself learn at your own natural pace.

Hazel

norseman
26-08-2011, 10:23 PM
Just a notion to consider. You will not "learn" wicca from books. Wicca is something in your heart, your soul, your spirit - it is emotional, spiritual and you gain this by living it, not by attending meetings and learning the "right" rituals.

Animus27
26-08-2011, 11:30 PM
"stay away from Raven Silverwolf." :D I was trying to say that without saying that. I still say Hutton !
:tongue:

I have never read any of Hutton's books, even though some of his stuff has been on my 'find a copy of' list. Which of his books do you recommend personally?

Just a notion to consider. You will not "learn" wicca from books. Wicca is something in your heart, your soul, your spirit - it is emotional, spiritual and you gain this by living it, not by attending meetings and learning the "right" rituals.
I'd agree with this somewhat. The thing is that Wicca is still a religion with some precepts and boundaries that make it Wicca, and not, say, Buddhism or Catholicism. So while it's important to foster a personal connection and experience, one has to adopt the Wiccan ritual & outlook for it to still be Wiccan, and not something else, in my opinion at least. Of course, 'something else' is not bad at all; I just think it's important to make distinctions, especially when someone is new to witchcraft or neo-paganism in general.

norseman
27-08-2011, 08:27 AM
@Animus

Hutton - Triumph of the Moon.
I am also very partial to Emma Wilby - Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits.
Both noted academics in Brit. universities.

There are many opinions on wicca. The biggest divergence is across the Atlantic. Most wiccans in UK are solitary, completely rejecting the coven model. Now I know that some people will argue that it's not wicca to be solitary. I reply that "wicca", or whatever name you care to use, has been around for millenia before Gardner rebadged it. Still best to consider Gardner's Wicca as a new branch on a very old tree :D

" Wicca is still a religion with some precepts and boundaries that make it Wicca, and not, say, Buddhism or Catholicism."
Really dont think I agree with this. Religions evolve over time. Wicca was "manufactured", also [catholicism] is there not a danger of style becoming more important than substance ? [titles, robes, dogma, rituals, etc]

Hazel/UndertheStars - dont worry about the differences in opinions here. Consider them and form your own judgement - what feels right for you !

Golden Angel
27-08-2011, 04:46 PM
i just felt the need to reply to this thread. I am a catholic altho i am not a practasing one, however i have become really interseted in Wicca, i love using herbs in my cooking and blending aromatherapy oils etc. I have just bought myself 2 books by kate west. The real witches kitchen, and the real witches herb garden. I don't really know much about wicca and covens altho i have a few books on spells and an encyclopedia on spiritual stuff and wicca comes into that area. To be honest i dont thnk i would join a coven, maybe more solitary. I think you have been given good advice re covens at your age.
I hope you enjoy your journey in exploring wicca ;)

Love Golden Angel ;)x

Neth Rana
11-09-2011, 02:39 AM
Hello :smile:
I'm not Wiccan, it just doesn't seem to "work" for me, if you will. I don't know, it's just not something I personally connect with. That being said, I really see how/why other people do. My boyfriend's sister is Wiccan and she really got me interested in checking it out. So I got my hands on a copy of "To Ride a Silver Broomstick." I know Norseman said stay away from Raven Silverwolf lol but I personally found the book fascinating! There were so many things I didn't know. It was all very fascinating and enlightening for me.

Anyways, I'm telling you this because:
1) You might try and take a look at the book, or one of the others people have suggested. My big advice on getting books is the library. You can stay at the library as long as you like and read whatever you like. :smile:

2) Even though I didn't end up becoming Wiccan, I still had to hide the book. My parents are really strong Christians. They mean the best, but I know for sure they would freak out if they knew I was reading that. So I empathize. :hug:

But anywaysss, that's just my little tid bit. The best of luck to you in trying to find your path and your light. :hug2:

pre-dawn
11-09-2011, 04:01 AM
So I got my hands on a copy of "To Ride a Silver Broomstick." I know Norseman said stay away from Raven Silverwolf lol but I personally found the book fascinating! There were so many things I didn't know. It was all very fascinating and enlightening for me.

IMO most people get involved in things like Wicca because they get a kick out of the unconventional and forbidden. It is part of asserting one individualism, in itself a spiritually suspect aim.

I believe that all which is really useful can be obtained without the fanciful stuff. Golden Angel's 'Witches kitchen' and 'Witches herb garden' use the word 'Witches' as a marketing ploy and all that knowledge will be available without it.

I don't think it is good advice to a young person to involve themselves in activities which they have to hide from other people, rather show alternate paths which can be taken, e.g. herbology, naturopathy, and generally accepted mental/energetic healing technologies.

norseman
11-09-2011, 09:02 AM
Going back to what I said about wicca being "a new branch on a very old tree", there is a real need to be clear as to what you think wicca actually is.
Gerald Gardner founded what he called New Witchcraft in the 1950's and it was based on, I suppose, Old Witchcraft - the origins of that go wandering back to the Neolithic and the tribal shaman of the Hunter-Gatherers in Europe. Just consider the word "Witchcraft" a little. It really ought to be written Witch Craft - the Craft of the Witch, the tools of the trade as it were. Witch, the word, comes along with the christian church as a word used to denigrate and persecute. The "old" name was Cunning or Wise Folk.

So, Gardner was a member of the New Forest Coven in England, an Old Witchcraft coven AND he was an ordained christian priest of an obscure branch of the Celtic Church - a very mystic branch, much given to animism. So, this gives you several clues to Gardner. He took a core of Craft and added rituals and initiatory rites from his coven experience plus his experiences in the Celtic church plus influences from the Closed Orders such as the Masonic Orders, Druidry and similar. His purpose was to open up the "faith" to a wider appeal by adding mysticism and exclusivity.
His new faith found fertile ground in the US and has flourished there. Much less so in the UK where most are solitaries and/or followers of the "old order". [The Druid connection comes from his friend and fellow Celtic priest, Ross Nichol who founded the largest British Order of Druids. Together, they established the Festival Calender based on the Farmer's Almanac ]
In the past, there has been much disagreement over "who is real and who is not" but it's all trivial to be honest because "new" or "old", there is still a core of Craft.

Flowers1992
11-09-2011, 07:08 PM
Books that I would recommend and have found useful myself are; Scott cunningham - Wicca for the solitary practioner (the text that brought me to this path) and living Wicca. I have also found " to ride a silver broomstick" by ravenwolf to be of great help, she is very readable and shows the various paths within Wicca. These books are cheap on amazon. I understand how you feel my parents although are what I like to call 'cultural christains' frown upon any belief that is not christainty even Judaism and Islam is 'weird and wrong' in their eyes. To get my hands on my books is I use my boyfriends amazon account and have them delivered to his house as his parents don't care, from there they are easy to hide, but you should decide if and when you are going to tell them, they love you you are their child and I doubt that prejudice will keep them from not speaking to you forever. I plan to tell mine when I have moved out, but that's my choice :p.

Goodluck and blessed be.

X