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Athear
30-03-2011, 12:30 PM
Hi There. Since i was smaller i have always been interested with things such as wicca and neo-druidism... however i could never really speak to anyone as i grew up in a family of entirely jehovah's witnesses... now that im older and finally have the chance, i was wondering if anyone could explain more about it to me so that i can finally understand or see why i have always had this drawing towards it.

Thanks
Athear

norseman
30-03-2011, 06:00 PM
Hi Athear, where to start ! :D
Wicca and Druidry - there is a connection between the foundation of both. Wicca was founded in the 50/60's in England by Gerald Gardner and he called his new path New Witchcraft. Essentially, he took aspects of the Old Craft, which is still going strong, and grafted on ritual and ceremonial from certain hermetic orders. His path was to be initiatory and coven-based. It was, and still is, a goddess faith. The largest of the neo-Druid organisation was founded by Ross Nicoll who was a close friend of Gardner. Both were actually ordained christian priests of an obscure Celtic church. Druidry today is largely a reconstruction as little survived from it's origins. Both wicca and druidry are Earth-accented which is a common feature of most pagan paths i.e. pagans are "green". Gardner and Nicol, together, formalised the Festival calender based on the ancient agricultural calender.
Wicca found a very fertile ground in the US, following the broad structure of Gardner, although it has branched since. The UK mostly followed the pre-existing Old Craft and practitioners are solitaries.
Be careful about books on wicca, many are rather bad and inaccurate being heavily influenced by pop culture.
If you would like serious, well-researched information, you should go to "The Triumph of the Moon" by Prof. Ronald Hutton, University of Bristol - thats a very good place to start.
Best of luck !

Athear
31-03-2011, 06:28 PM
thank you so much norseman.
i actually found the book on take2 which i will probably be ordering soon. thank you for the suggestion. I also would like to find out (your view of course) how most people today follow Wicca and Neo-Druidism... Is it more practical in what they do or is it more towards what they believe in? Are you either of the above or both? You seem to be very knowledgeable :)

tragblack
31-03-2011, 07:03 PM
I also would like to find out (your view of course) how most people today follow Wicca and Neo-Druidism... Is it more practical in what they do or is it more towards what they believe in?

Everyone has a different pagan flavor. I'm somewhere between total practicality and spirituality.

tragblack
31-03-2011, 07:03 PM
Since i was smaller i have always been interested with things such as wicca and neo-druidism... however i could never really speak to anyone as i grew up in a family of entirely jehovah's witnesses...
That's tough!

now that im older and finally have the chance, i was wondering if anyone could explain more about it to me so that i can finally understand or see why i have always had this drawing towards it.
Pick up some books on the subject. Reading forums is a great start. It's all about physical practice too, not just reading.

norseman
01-04-2011, 07:41 AM
Hi Athear. Cant say much about neo-Druidry because I have never had contact with it to any degree.
Like many, my first foray into spirituality was Wicca but I soon discarded all the ceremonial, etc and was advised by a High Priestess that I was more like one of the Cunning Folk. Never heard of that so I started to look into it and found, to my absolute delight, that it was what I had been doing for 30+ years. Simply, the Cunning/Wise folk were originally tribal shaman in neolithic/Bronze Age society. During the time of the Witch Hunts, they escaped by "being too useful" - sometimes called White Witches and sometimes even used as witch finders. Many of them were even christian priests [ in disguise as it were]. Their craft was very practical and largely rural. The Cunning Man was a weather watcher, a carer of the tribe's male breeding stock [ the bull, stallion, ram, boar ]. He invoked local spirits to ensure good harvests and good hunting. His partner was the Wise Woman - the medicine woman, midwife, etc. She invoked the Mother Goddess.
They are still here but now often called Hedge Witches, still in mostly rural settings, still practicing "Old Craft" but in a modern setting - [in the past blessing the oxen but now blessing your tractor]. Spirituality generally Earth-centered - Mother Earth as deity.
My own "thing" is planting acorns in areas that, in the past, had stands of Oaks and I ask blessings on everyone I plant.
If you look back in the Wicca thread, you will find a long post I did "The Cunning Fire".

The key to your interest in Wicca/Druidry has to be a love of Mother Earth :smile:

ZeroPointField
01-04-2011, 09:34 AM
Athear, if you haven't found him already, I think Christopher Penczak is an excellent author on some of the topics you're asking about. He writes about all things spiritual and healing related, but from the perspective of witchcraft of which he is deeply involved in. He is very eclectic, his views are very open-minded and he gives you lots of background and practical applications from a wide variety of perspective. He has a number of books, and also a line devoted specifically to witchcraft. I realize Wicca is somewhat different than witchcraft, and I'm not sure which he favors, but he talks about both. I had a rather negative connotation in my head associated with some of these things even after I got really into studying a lot of different belief systems, but his books really helped me to understand the true meaning of witchcraft, which I now find to be really beautiful.

TaoZen
05-04-2011, 05:07 AM
Some of the basics are great places to start but as mentioned books are the way to go as far as I am concerned.

Really to me Wicca is the magical (and I don't mean magic like in Charmed) means of connecting to the nature of what you wish to connect with and I will say this, if it is speaking to you, even if it's not correct it is worth a look into.

Bucklands for some is a good place to start

I can't post links yet

Bucklands Complete Book of Witchcraft is the title

norseman
05-04-2011, 08:01 AM
" Wicca is the magical (and I don't mean magic like in Charmed) means of connecting to the nature of what you wish to connect with"

TaoZen, We are in agreement there, I think. I see it as channeling Earth energies to achieve what you wish to connect with.

Athear
05-04-2011, 09:45 AM
thank you to all of you who are giving advice. it really is appreciated :)
i am getting a list on some readings and hopefully will be ordering 2 of the books suggested so far. Sadly it will take a while since i'm in South Africa and need to ship them :D